Before the Flood – Documentary by Leonardo DiCaprio

Before the Flood – Documentary by Leonardo DiCaprio

Producers: Leonardo DiCaprio & Fisher Stevens
Via Before the Flood

Video recommended by Andrea López Tyrer from the Chile/Spain, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

If you could know the truth about the threat of climate change — would you want to know? Before the Flood, presented by National Geographic, features Leonardo DiCaprio on a journey as a United Nations Messenger of Peace, traveling to five continents and the Arctic to witness climate change firsthand. He goes on expeditions with scientists uncovering the reality of climate change and meets with political leaders fighting against inaction. He also discovers a calculated disinformation campaign orchestrated by powerful special interests working to confuse the public about the urgency of the growing climate crisis. With unprecedented access to thought leaders around the world, DiCaprio searches for hope in a rising tide of catastrophic news.

From Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Fisher Stevens and Academy Award®-winning actor, environmental activist and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio, Before the Flood presents a riveting account of the dramatic changes now occurring around the world due to climate change, as well as the actions we as individuals and as a society can take to prevent the disruption of life on our planet. Beyond the steps we can take as individuals, the film urges viewers to push their elected officials in supporting the use of alternative energy sources such as solar and wind power. “We need everyone to demand bold action from their political leaders and to elect representatives who have their best interests at heart, not the interests of corporations to perpetuate a cycle of greed and destruction,” says DiCaprio. “This documentary shows how interconnected the fate of all humanity is — but also the power we all possess as individuals to build a better future for our planet.”

Before the Flood premieres in theaters on October 21st and will air globally on the National Geographic Channel on October 30th in 171 countries and 45 languages. The film is directed by Fisher Stevens and produced by Leonardo DiCaprio, Fisher Stevens, Jennifer Davisson and Trevor Davidoski with Brett Ratner and James Packer of RatPac Entertainment. It was written by Mark Monroe and Executive Produced by Martin Scorsese, Adam Bardach, Mark Monroe, and Zara Duffy. The film is edited by Geoffrey Richman A.C.E., Ben Sozanski, Abhay Sofsky, and Brett Banks. The Director of Photography is Antonio Rossi. The Executive Music Producers are Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross with original music by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, Mogwai and Gustavo Santaolalla.

The carbon emissions from Before The Flood were offset through a voluntary carbon tax. Learn how you can offset your own carbon emissions by going to CarboTax.org

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Shhhh, We’ve Got a Secret: Soil Solves Global Warming

Shhhh, We’ve Got a Secret: Soil Solves Global Warming

Author: George Spyros
Via Tree Hugger | June 28, 2007

Article recommended by Mick Lorusso from the USA / Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

 

In the seven-minute video after the jump, QuantumShift.tv turns its lens to the carbon emissions caused by large-scale farming practices used in growing much of the food in the United States, Canada and the UK. According to the video Soil: The Secret Solution to Global Warming, land farmed organically, using such methods as “no-till” and the planting of winter cover crops, absorbs and holds up to 30% more carbon than conventional agriculture. Converting all US farmland to organic would reduce CO2 emissions by 10%. The UK version of the video states that such a conversion would result in a 20% per year reduction in CO2 emissions (although the on-screen graphic still reads 10%, ostensibly because only the voice-over has been changed from the US version). The extra carbon in the soil also increases food nutrients, which could greatly reduce health care costs. Dig a little deeper after the jump.

The land-based carbon cycle works as plants take CO2 out of the atmosphere and convert it to organic material by photosynthesis. The oxygen in the molecule is released back into the air and the carbon becomes part of the plant’s structure and eventually the soil. Plowing churns up this organic matter and introduces oxygen which expedites its decay. That is, the exposed carbon recombines with oxygen and is released into the atmosphere as CO2, a principle greenhouse gas. The organic farming practice of no-till greatly reduces this large-scale break-up of soil by cutting small slits that are just large enough to accommodate the planting of seeds, thereby conserving the amount of carbon stored in the earth. From a policy perspective, it is most accurate and I think effective to refer to such storing as “agricultural carbon sequestration” in opposition to the industrial catch phrase “carbon sequestration” which refers to the business of going to impractical lengths and assuming a high degree of risk to bury CO2 in the earth’s crust. According to the USDA, U.S. agricultural soils have lost, on average, about one-third of the carbon they contained before wide-scale cultivation began in the 1800s, but more on that later. The video also points out that less tillage also decreases C02 emissions from farm machinery since the equipment makes fewer runs over the field. Also, the benefits of no-till sequestration are tripled when combined with the planting of winter cover crops which are used in organic farming to maintain a healthy soil.

Much of the data in the video is based on a 27-year comparative study conducted by the Rodale Institute in Pennsylvannia which also dispels the myth that chemical fertilizers are needed to provide better yields. Today I spoke briefly with Dr. Paul Hepperly who’s featured in the video in an on-camera interview, and he told me that the data from the study has been taken up by Kyoto Protocol signatories Great Britain, Germany and the Netherlands as a component of their climate roadmaps for reducing atmospheric CO2 levels. Notwithstanding that good news, petitions are available which have the goal of pushing leaders to shift existing agricultural subsidies from conventional to organic farming. Go here to sign for the US, Canada or ROW (rest of world).

Image: YouTube

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50 Years Ago, This Was a Wasteland. He Changed Everything | Short Film Showcase

Author: National Geographic
Via YouTube | April 24, 2017

 

Almost 50 years ago, fried chicken tycoon David Bamberger used his fortune to purchase 5,500 acres of overgrazed land in the Texas Hill Country. Planting grasses to soak in rains and fill hillside aquifers, Bamberger devoted the rest of his life to restoring the degraded landscape. Today, the land has been restored to its original habitat and boasts enormous biodiversity. Bamberger’s model of land stewardship is now being replicated across the region and he is considered to be a visionary in land management and water conservation.

About Short Film Showcase:
The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

In Selah: Water from Stone by Fin & Fur Films, see how former Church’s Chicken CEO David Bamberger transformed a desert wasteland into a wildlife oasis.

Directed by Ben Masters: http://benmasters.com/

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