Gorillaz – Andromeda

Gorillaz – Andromeda

By: Gorillaz
Via YouTube | March 23, 2017

Video recommended by Fernanda Xanat López Ortega from Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

When the passing looks to die for
Take it in your heart now, lover
When the case is out
And tired and sodden
Take it in your heart
Take it in your heart
Back to when it was cool
‘Cause there’s no substitute
Who even knows the truth?
The truth, the truth
Take it in your heart now, lover
Take it in your heart, heart, heart, heart
Take it in your heart
Take it in your heart, heart, heart, heart
Where it all goes down
Outside, cold and ghosting out with jet lag
I took it to the right man
Took it all back
When the courts were closing
It was Bobby gracing
I know that
A bullet to the right man
He pulled it back
Caught in your eyes
Stacks of lights
Come streaming back
Make it for the best times
Growing pains, good times
Good times, good times
Good times, good times
Good times, good times
Take it in your heart now, lover
Take it in your heart, heart, heart, heart
Take it in your heart
Take it in your heart
Where it all goes down
Andromeda
Andromeda, Andromeda
Take it in your heart now, lover
Andromeda, Andromeda
Andromeda, Andromeda
Take it in your heart
Take it in your heart
Where it all goes down
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The artist who made protesters’ mirrored shields says the ‘struggle porn’ media miss point of Standing Rock

The artist who made protesters’ mirrored shields says the ‘struggle porn’ media miss point of Standing Rock

By: Carolina A. Miranda
Via Los Angeles Times| January 24, 2017

Website recommended by Mick Lorusso from the US/Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

For Cannupa Hanska Luger, the protests at Standing Rock are personal. The artist, who makes sculpture, video and installations, was born on the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota, and he is an enrolled member of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, whose territory is nearby. He is in possession of German and Norwegian blood too. “I am North Dakota,” he jokes.

Now based in New Mexico, where he was recently an artist in residence at the Institute of American Indian Arts, he has been traveling to his home state over the last nine months to support the encampment in opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline. Though many protesters left the site after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers denied a permit for the pipeline in early December — and after a hard winter set in — the encampment is still active.

In this lightly edited telephone conversation, which took place late in December, he discusses what it’s been like to watch the protests evolve, why these have been so important to Native American culture and what inspired him to produce mirrored shields to help protect activists on the front lines.

What was it like to see Standing Rock develop into one of the major news events of 2016?

It’s been pretty interesting — even more so being from that region and growing up around there. When we were kids, we used to fish and dive off of those bridges that are now the front lines. That river is home. I go back every summer guaranteed. I’ve been up seven or eight times since this whole thing began.

My dad’s side of the family, they have a ranch in the Standing Rock reservation. My mom’s side is from Fort Berthold [reservation], which is where the current oil fields are. I watched that community get destroyed by the extraction of oil. I’ve seen wells poisoned. I’ve seen the cycles of boom and bust.

A lot of artists I’ve spoken with have described their journeys to the Standing Rock encampment as transformative.

It seems like everyone who has interacted with the space, there is something transformative that has happened there. The media’s general interest is in “struggle porn,” so people have missed what is beautiful about it.

When you first come through the gate — there is one entrance and one exit — they look through your car. They ask you if you have weapons or drugs. Then you are welcomed in, and they say, “Welcome home.” Your first interaction is being included, which is not something that people are used to in this country. This is an exclusive country. It’s all about fences and borders.

You set up camp and someone gives you firewood. The whole thing of guarding your stuff goes away. It’s so much easier to share things. Culturally we have a practice called “seven generations.” As you walk through the world, you are not yourself. You are not a singularity. You are not an American individualist bootstrapping bull …. You are only borrowing this place from children you will never meet. And the only reason you have an opportunity to do that is because elders took care of it for you.

Everybody came in hoping to experience something new, something profound. But when they got there, they realized they’re not a part of something new, they’ve just been absorbed into something that is much older than the entire country. That’s incredibly humbling.

What do you think Standing Rock has done for society’s understanding of indigenous culture and issues?

The big difference is that I think [people have] had the opportunity to encounter us not as a mystic, romantic other. It’s just like, “Dude, we’re just human beings.” What does “Lakota” mean in English? It literally means “the people.”

This is why we say this is not a protest, why we are water protectors. We’re not just in protest of a pipeline. What we are trying to do is maintain a cultural practice. This is our culture. It’s a part of our society.

Our original bible, that comes down from on high, it is the land. We have an oral tradition and we tell stories about magical characters that are bound to the landscape, that are bound to geology. Why is that stone red? There is a story. So where everyone else sees a pipeline and “progress,” what we see is someone going through our bible and editing things without any care, ripping a line straight through that story.

The media’s general interest is in ‘struggle porn,’ so people have missed what is beautiful about it.— Artist Cannupa Hanska Luger on the Standing Rock protests

The battle for the pipeline isn’t over, but having the Army Corps of Engineers deny the permit certainly stands as an important victory.

The amazing thing is that whether you were Native or not, what we witnessed up there is the awakening of a giant that has been sleeping. It’s the power of us as living things — rather than us waiting for somebody to save us. It was so grass roots.

Native people have never been subject to that amount of solidarity. It left everybody awestruck. And the number of Native people coming together, nothing like this has been seen since the 19th century. Enemies that had previously been enemies, coming together — there’s no way for me to describe to you what that means. It’s far too profound.

 

arttextum-replicacion-la-times2

You made a series of mirrored shields that you distributed to people on the front lines. How did that come about?

I was inspired by these activists in the Ukraine. These women — old women and children — and they came out and carried mirrors from their bathrooms and into the street to show these riot policemen what they looked like. From the photos I saw, it seemed profoundly effective. I wanted to bring that same level of recognition to the front lines there.

But Standing Rock is in the middle of nowhere. I didn’t want people to bring mirrors to the front line and get hit with batons and cause more damage than good. So what we needed was a mirrored shield. So I came up with a simple, easy and cheap design to make these mirrored shields using vinyl and Masonite — materials you can find in any hardware store. From one sheet of Masonite, you could make six shields.

I started making them after that Sunday that they were hitting people with hoses. I personally made close to 100 of them. But then another group out of Minneapolis made 500. I have no idea how many are in circulation. But I keep seeing them here and there.

What role do you think artists can have in protest?

 

Being an artist, it is a way to weaponize privilege. I could have been on the front line a dozen times, but my wife said, “You are one person there; you are 10,000 here — where you can engage all of these resources.”

I did a mural at the Center for Civil and Human Rights [in Atlanta] about these issues because I had the opportunity. And if I don’t utilize every amount of privilege for a cause that’s worthwhile, then what is the point? If I am not for you, then who am I for?Artists, we live on the periphery. But we are the mirrors. We are the reflective points that break through a barrier. You don’t have to be in the same economic place that I am to relate to the work that I make. That is the power of art.

We are not rich people. But we are incredibly wealthy. We have ideas.

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Why you should define your fears instead of your goals | Tim Ferriss

By: TED
Via Youtube | July 14, 2017

The hard choices — what we most fear doing, asking, saying — are very often exactly what we need to do. How can we overcome self-paralysis and take action? Tim Ferriss encourages us to fully envision and write down our fears in detail, in a simple but powerful exercise he calls “fear-setting.” Learn more about how this practice can help you thrive in high-stress environments and separate what you can control from what you cannot.

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Objetivo de desarrollo sostenible: Lograr que las ciudades y los asentamientos humanos sean inclusivos, seguros, resilientes y sostenibles

Autor: Naciones Unidas
Vía Naciones Unidas | Progresos en el logro de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible 2017

El 25 de septiembre de 2015, los líderes mundiales adoptaron un conjunto de objetivos globales para erradicar la pobreza, proteger el planeta y asegurar la prosperidad para todos como parte de una nueva agenda de desarrollo sostenible. Cada objetivo tiene metas específicas que deben alcanzarse en los próximos 15 años.

Para alcanzar estas metas, todo el mundo tiene que hacer su parte: los gobiernos, el sector privado, la sociedad civil y personas como usted.

¿Quieres participar? Puedes empezar por decirle a todos acerca de estos objetivos.

Objetivo 11: Lograr que las ciudades y los asentamientos humanos sean inclusivos, seguros, resilientes y sostenibles

arttextum-replicacion-ciudades2

Las ciudades son hervideros de ideas, comercio, cultura, ciencia, productividad, desarrollo social y mucho más. En el mejor de los casos, las ciudades han permitido a las personas progresar social y económicamente.

Ahora bien, son muchos los problemas que existen para mantener ciudades de manera que se sigan creando empleos y prosperidad sin ejercer presión sobre la tierra y los recursos. Los problemas comunes de las ciudades son la congestión, la falta de fondos para prestar servicios básicos, la escasez de vivienda adecuada y el deterioro de la infraestructura.

Los problemas que enfrentan las ciudades se pueden vencer de manera que les permita seguir prosperando y creciendo, y al mismo tiempo aprovechar mejor los recursos y reducir la contaminación y la pobreza. El futuro que queremos incluye a ciudades de oportunidades, con acceso a servicios básicos, energía, vivienda, transporte y más facilidades para todos.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


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Antonio Vega “Lucha de gigantes”

Vídeo: Sol Música
Vía YouTube | Noviembre 30, 2012

Video recomendado por Andrea López Tyrer, colaboradora de Chile/España, para Replicación de Arttextum

Lucha de gigantes
Convierte,
El aire en gas natural
Un duelo salvaje
Advierte,
Lo cerca que ando de entrar
En un mundo descomunal
Siento mi fragilidad.Vaya pesadilla
Corriendo,
Con una bestia detras
Dime que es mentira todo,
Un sueño tonto y no más
Me da miedo la inmesidad
Donde nadie oye mi voz.Deja de engañar
No quieras ocultar
Que has pasado sin tropezar
Monstruo de papel
No sé contra quien voy
O es que acaso hay alguien mas aquí?Creo en los fantasmas terribles
De algun extraño lugar
Y en mis tonterías
Para hacer tu risa estallar
Deja de engañar
No quieras ocultar
Que has pasado sin tropezar
Monstruo de papel
No se contra quien voy
O es que acaso hay alguien más aquí?
Deja que pasemos sin miedo.

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Soy yo – Bomba Estéreo

Autores: Eric Frederic / Liliana Margarita Saumet Avila / Federico Simon Mejia Ochoa / Joe Spargur
Vía YouTube

Soy yo
Bomba Estéreo
Me caí, me paré, caminé, me subí
Me fui contra la corriente y también me perdí
Fracasé, me encontré, lo viví y aprendí
Cuando te pegas fuerte más profundo es el beat
Sigo bailando y escribiendo mis letras
Sigo cantando con las puertas abiertas
Atravesando todas estas tierras
Y no hay que viajar tanto pa’ encontrar la respuesta
Y no te preocupes si no te aprueban
Cuando te critiquen, tú solo di
Soy yo
Soy yo
Soy yo (soy, soy, soy, soy, soy, soy, soy)
Soy yo (yo, yo, yo, yo, yo, yo, yo)
Sigo caminando y sigo riendo
Hago lo que quiero y muero en el intento
A nadie le importa lo que estoy haciendo
Lo único que importa es lo que está por dentro
A mí me gusta estar en la arena
Bañarme en el mar sin razón, sin problema
Estar sentada sin hacer nada
Mirando de lejos y estar relajada
Y no te preocupes si no te aprueban
Cuando te critiquen, tú solo di
Soy yo
Soy yo
Soy yo (soy, soy, soy, soy, soy, soy, soy)
Soy yo (yo, yo, yo, yo, yo, yo, yo)
Soy así, soy así, soy así (Relaja)
Y tú ni me conoces a mí (Bien relaja)
Soy así, soy así, soy así (Relaja)
Y tú ni me conoces a mí (Bien relaja)
You know what I mean? You know what I mean?
Sí, papá
Y no te preocupes si no te aprueban
Cuando te critiquen, tú solo di
Soy yo
Soy yo
Soy yo (soy, soy, soy, soy, soy, soy, soy)
Soy yo (yo, yo, yo, yo, yo, yo, yo)
En la cama
Relajá
Con mi encanto
Con pijama, soy yo
Así soy yo.

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Purcell: Dido & Aeneas – Jessye Norman

Purcell: Dido & Aeneas – Jessye Norman

Autores: Dido & Aeneas 1986 recording English Chamber Orchestra, Jessye Norman, Robert Aldwinckle, Della Jones, Thomas Allen, Adrian Beers, Patricia Kern, Elizabeth Gale
Vía YouTube

Video recomendado por Fernanda Mejía, colaboradora de México para Replicación de Arttextum

Dido & Aeneas 1986 recording English Chamber Orchestra, Jessye Norman, Robert Aldwinckle, Della Jones, Thomas Allen, Adrian Beers, Patricia Kern, Elizabeth Gale 0:00 Dido and Aeneas – Overture 2:09 Dido and Aeneas / Act 1 – “Shake the cloud from off your brow” Marie McLaughlin 3:24 Dido and Aeneas / Act 1 – “Ah! Belinda, I am prest with torment” Jessye Norman 9:05 Dido and Aeneas / Act 1 – “Whence could so much virtue spring?” – “Fear no danger” Jessye Norman 12:36 Dido and Aeneas / Act 1 – “See, your Royal Guest” – “If not for mine” – “To the hills and the vales” – The Triumphing Dance Marie McLaughlin 17:59 Dido and Aeneas / Act 2 – Prelude for the witches English Chamber Orchestra 19:00 Dido and Aeneas / Act 2 – “Wayward sisters” – “But ere we this perform” Patricia Kern 23:58 Dido and Aeneas / Act 2 – “In our deep vaulted cell” – Echo Dance of the Furies English Chamber Orchestra Chorus 27:05 Dido and Aeneas / Act 2 – Ritornelle – “Thanks to these lonesome vales” Marie McLaughlin 29:50 Dido and Aeneas / Act 2 – “Oft she visits” – “Behold, upon my bending spear” Elizabeth Gale 33:15 Dido and Aeneas / Act 2 – “Stay, Prince” – “Jove’s commands shall be obey’d” Derek Lee Ragin 36:37 Dido and Aeneas / Act 3 – Prelude – “Come away, fellow sailors” Patrick Power 39:11 Dido and Aeneas / Act 3 – The sailor’s Dance – “See the flags” – “Destruction’sour delight” – The Witches’ Dance Patricia Kern 42:42 Dido and Aeneas / Act 3 – “Your counsel all is urged in vain” – “But death, alas” Jessye Norman 48:14 Dido and Aeneas / Act 3 – “Thy hand, Belinda…When I am laid in earth” Jessye Norman 53:38 Dido and Aeneas / Act 3 – “With drooping wings” English Chamber Orchestra Chorus

Imagen de portada: Achievement

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The Video That Will Change Your Future

By: Video Advice
Via YouTube | July 4, 2017

The most Inspirational video ever by Morgan Freeman. It’s very emotional but motivating at the same time. “I wish someone told me this when I was young.” -Morgan Freeman
 

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Matisyahu – One Day (YouTube Version)

Matisyahu – One Day

By: MatisyahuVEVO
Via YouTube October 25, 2009

Video recommended by Mick Lorusso from the US/Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

Matisyahu’s official music video for ‘One Day’.

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The Black Eyed Peas – Where Is The Love?

Authors: George Jr Pajon, Justin Timberlake, Michael Fratantuno, Printz Board, Allan Pineda, Will Adams, Jaime Gomez
Via YouTube | Uploaded on Jun 16, 2009

 

Music video by Black Eyed Peas performing Where Is The Love?. (C) 2003 Interscope Geffen (A&M) Records A Division of UMG Recordings Inc.

Where Is The Love?

What’s wrong with the world, mama
People livin’ like they ain’t got no mamas
I think the whole world addicted to the drama
Only attracted to things that’ll bring you trauma

Overseas, yeah, we try to stop terrorism
But we still got terrorists here livin’
In the USA, the big CIA
The Bloods and The Crips and the KKK

But if you only have love for your own race
Then you only leave space to discriminate
And to discriminate only generates hate
And when you hate then you’re bound to get irate, yeah

Madness is what you demonstrate
And that’s exactly how anger works and operates
Man, you gotta have love just to set it straight
Take control of your mind and meditate
Let your soul gravitate to the love, y’all, y’all

People killin’, people dyin’
Children hurt and you hear them cryin’
Can you practice what you preach?
Or would you turn the other cheek?

Father, Father, Father help us
Send some guidance from above
‘Cause people got me, got me questionin’
Where is the love (Love)

Where is the love (The love) [2x]
Where is the love, the love, the love

It just ain’t the same, old ways have changed
New days are strange, is the world insane?
If love and peace are so strong
Why are there pieces of love that don’t belong?

Nations droppin’ bombs
Chemical gasses fillin’ lungs of little ones
With ongoin’ sufferin’ as the youth die young
So ask yourself is the lovin’ really gone

So I could ask myself really what is goin’ wrong
In this world that we livin’ in people keep on givin’ in
Makin’ wrong decisions, only visions of them dividends
Not respectin’ each other, deny thy brother
A war is goin’ on but the reason’s undercover

The truth is kept secret, it’s swept under the rug
If you never know truth then you never know love
Where’s the love, y’all, come on (I don’t know)
Where’s the truth, y’all, come on (I don’t know)
Where’s the love, y’all

People killin’, people dyin’
Children hurt and you hear them cryin’
Can you practice what you preach?
Or would you turn the other cheek?

Father, Father, Father help us
Send some guidance from above
‘Cause people got me, got me questionin’
Where is the love (Love)

Where is the love (The love)? [6x]
Where is the love, the love, the love?

I feel the weight of the world on my shoulder
As I’m gettin’ older, y’all, people gets colder
Most of us only care about money makin’
Selfishness got us followin’ the wrong direction

Wrong information always shown by the media
Negative images is the main criteria
Infecting the young minds faster than bacteria
Kids wanna act like what they see in the cinema

Yo’, whatever happened to the values of humanity
Whatever happened to the fairness and equality
Instead of spreading love we’re spreading animosity
Lack of understanding, leading us away from unity

That’s the reason why sometimes I’m feelin’ under
That’s the reason why sometimes I’m feelin’ down
There’s no wonder why sometimes I’m feelin’ under
Gotta keep my faith alive ‘til love is found
Now ask yourself

Where is the love? [4x]

Father, Father, Father, help us
Send some guidance from above
‘Cause people got me, got me questionin’
Where is the love?

Sing with me y’all:
One world, one world (We only got)
One world, one world (That’s all we got)
One world, one world
And something’s wrong with it (Yeah)
Something’s wrong with it (Yeah)
Something’s wrong with the wo-wo-world, yeah
We only got
(One world, one world)
That’s all we got
(One world, one world)

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Malala’s father: “She is the spirit of happiness in this house”

Author: Abigail Pesta
Via The NY Times | February 29, 2016

 

As the teenage Nobel prize winner prepares for her next step — college — her father tells Women in the World about how she is adjusting to her new life in England

When 15-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head on her school bus by the Taliban, a devastating thought crossed her father’s mind: Was he to blame?

Malala’s dad, Ziauddin Yousafzai, had strongly encouraged his daughter to pursue an education in Pakistan, defying the Taliban order that girls should not go to school, but should stay silent, marry young, and obey their husbands.

“When something bad happens, an honest person asks himself, what was my role? I think this is natural. The day Malala was shot was the most difficult day of my life. In that moment, it came to my mind, yes, could I have done differently? Could I have stopped her? I asked my wife if I had done the right thing,” Ziauddin told Women in the World by phone from England, where the family now lives. “My wife said, ‘Yes, you did the right thing. You and Malala are fighting for education, for equality. You are standing for your rights.’”

His moment of doubt passed, but he and his wife had to wait in agony for a week, wondering if their daughter would wake up from a coma. When she did, her first words, scribbled with a pen, were about her dad. “Why have I no father?” she asked, fearing he could be dead.

Ziauddin’s influence on his daughter’s life runs deep. In the documentary He Named Me Malala, which has its global television premiere on Monday night on the National Geographic Channel, it is clear how he raised his daughter to shun the patriarchal, tribal notions of a girl’s role of subservience in society. A schoolteacher and outspoken critic of the Taliban, he sent Malala to school at a young age and urged her to talk about politics and topics often reserved for boys. “I tried my best to treat my daughter as myself,” he told Women in the World. “I gave her a lot of freedom.”

He encouraged Malala to stay in school when she entered her teenage years — a time when Pakistani girls are typically “stopped from going out of the home” and married off, he said. He recalled how a man once complained to Malala’s mother that Malala was showing herself in public, continuing to go to school. “He said, ‘Malala brings shame to the family. You should not be doing this.’ When my wife told me this, I said, ‘This is my family. He should not poke his nose into my family affairs.’” Now, the same man “is a big supporter of Malala,” Ziauddin said. “Change starts in the close family, then it goes to the extended family, then it spreads to towns and cities and countries.”

Thoughout her school years in the Swat Valley, Malala became increasingly upset about how the Taliban targeted and bombed schools for girls. When a BBC correspondent asked her father if a girl at his school would anonymously blog about the situation, Ziauddin asked Malala if she would be interested. She said yes. Later she appeared with her dad in a video by New York Times reporter Adam B. Ellick, showing her face and saying she wanted to become a doctor. She began speaking publicly at events, campaigning for education for girls. In October 2012, a gunman boarded her school bus, asked for her by name, and gunned her down. She was not expected to survive. She was flown to a hospital in Birmingham, England, for medical care, and her family followed. Doctors performed brain surgery, attaching a metal plate to her skull and a cochlear implant to restore hearing to her left ear. Part of her face remains paralyzed.

Malala has struggled to adjust to school in the West. “Just think of a young girl who was studying in a far-flung area of Pakistan and had never been together with girls from the U.K., whose country and culture is different,” Ziauddin said. In the film, Malala talks about how the girls at her high school in England are busy dating boys. “Most of them have boyfriends. Most of them have broken up with some of the boyfriends and found new ones,” she says. In her native Pakistan, there was no dating, just marriage. If a family had a television, the Taliban burned it. And if people spoke out against the Taliban, they got executed in the town square.

“It was quite hard in the beginning for Malala,” Ziauddin said of his daughter’s new life. “But I must give her credit. She is so resilient and such a smart girl, she was able to get used to her new environment and make friends.” In the film, Malala surfs the Internet and giggles about a favorite Pakistani cricket player and tennis star Roger Federer. She enjoys mini-golf, bowling, and “fighting with her brothers,” her father told Women in the World with a laugh. “She is the spirit of happiness in this house. This house is like a dungeon without her.” Malala has two younger brothers, also attending school in England. Malala’s mother, Toor Pekai Yousafzai, is getting educated as well, learning to read and write, she said last October at the Women in the World Summit in London.

Malala’s school has made a point of treating her “as a normal student,” Ziauddin said. When she won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, that was the first time she addressed the school, he said. Now 18 years old, Malala is applying to college and is interested in Oxford University, among others, her father said. He added that he will feel sad when she leaves home, but also “very pleased” to see her move forward with her schooling. In describing his hopes for her, he recalled a trip he took with her to Islamabad before the attack. “We went to a function and she gave a talk as if she was my son. My dream for her then was that one day, I want to see Malala come here to Islamabad on her own to give this talk, no chaperone. She should be independent. When she goes to college, she will be independent. She will be on her own. We will be good.”

Ziauddin grew up with five sisters, none of whom were given the opportunity for an education in Pakistan. They were married off, and never had an identity of their own. “No girl was given an education when I was a schoolboy,” he said. “I saw so much discrimination. Many men in society, they are comfortable with what is going on. Few people stand for change. Whatever I saw wrong in my early life, I wanted to respond with equality and justice. My goal was not to condemn, but to change.”

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Francisco Toledo, la metamorfosis de “Duelo”

Francisco Toledo, la metamorfosis de “Duelo”

Autor: Fabián Muhlia
Vía Cultura Colectiva | Noviembre 11, 2015

Artículo recomendado por Fabián Muhlia, colaborador de México para Replicación de Arttextum

Hablar sobre Francisco Toledo (Juchitán,Oaxaca,1940) siempre es un deleite porque se trata de un artista con un compromiso social constante e imaginación ilimitada. Basta recordar su postura ante la desaparición de los 43 normalistas de Ayotzinapa (creó 43 papalotes con los rostros de los estudiantes desaparecidos e hizo un performance en Oaxaca) y también su incansable defensa del Cerro del Fortín en el sur del país ante la intención, por parte del gobierno estatal, de construir un Centro de Convenciones en esa parte natural de la ciudad oaxaqueña.

En esta ocasión, Francisco Toledo expone su obra cerámica en alta temperatura en el Museo de Arte Moderno de la Ciudad de México (MAM), ubicado entre el Paseo de la Reforma y el Bosque de Chapultepec y durará hasta el 28 de febrero del 2016. Cabe destacar que es la segunda exposición retrospectiva del pintor oaxaqueño en este museo.

La museografía es muy parecida a la de la exposición Resumen del fuego, del escultor Fernando González Cortázar, exhibida en el mismo recinto en marzo del 2014,  ya que dentro de las paredes oscuras se desvelan con una luz especialmente dirigida (casi teatral) a las excelentes piezas cerámicas de Francisco Toledo, todas ellas realizadas durante este 2015 en el Taller Canela del maestro ceramista Jerónimo López, un anexo del Centro de las Artes de San Agustín (CaSa), Oaxaca.

toledo-arttextum

En esta muestra abundan los personajes ya característicos de su obra: sapos, magueyes, maíz, coyotes, penes transformados en cañones, aves, rostros que sufren y tarántulas.

Siempre que observo la obra de Toledo está presente el color rojo en mil formas y texturas posibles: rojo fuego, rojo sangre, rojo quemado y rojo natural nacido de pigmentos oaxaqueños que han inspirado todo un movimiento de artistas plásticos originarios de esa ciudad.

Como referente histórico es preciso mencionar la gran influencia que ha tenido sobre este movimiento el célebre pintor Rufino Tamayo (Oaxaca, 1899- 1991), un artista que produjo una realidad pictórica alterna a la de los tres grandes muralistas mexicanos: José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros y Diego Rivera.

Las tres obras que más llamaron mi atención son jarrones que se asemejan a sus grabados (una técnica por demás célebre de Toledo) traducidos al formato tridimensional de la cerámica en colores rojo, negro y amarillo. Todos ellos envueltos por espinas que los hacen abandonar la forma tradicional de un objeto cerámico y los transforman en organismos mágicos que respiran y sienten, que sufren metamorfosis y sangran.

Hay una obra más que también me fascinó. Consiste en una figura humana de dos cabezas que emerge de cuatro patas y está manchado de sangre en sus caras y estómago. Es un grito visual muy profundo que se hace más agudo cuando observamos que los rostros tienen ausencia de ojos (hoyos negros).

Personaje de 2 cabezas
Al recorrer la exposición de principio a fin, encontraremos el dolor que causa la injusticia en nuestro país, ya que son piezas crudas de verdad, como verdadera es la realidad sangrante de México.

El título es muy adecuado porque esa realidad es nuestro duelo, nuestra gran pérdida de confianza de un futuro pero también nos invita a reflexionar sobre cómo podemos renacer por medio del arte, tal como lo ha hecho Francisco Toledo.

Imágenes: cortesía del autor.

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