New Eco Search Engine Lets You Plant Trees While Surfing the Internet

By: The mind circle
Via: The mind circle

Google statistics show they process roughly 3.5 billion searches for people each and every day. This accumulates to around 1.2 trillion searches annually. The things people are searching for range from cute cat pictures to fetish style porn. However, a nonprofit organization in Berlin has created a way for people’s nonstop clicking and searching to help save the world’s forests.

The search engine “Ecosia” is an unusual search engine that does something that no other search engine does. With the advertising revenue that it generates, the nonprofit spends that money on the environment. It uses the money to plant more trees throughout the world and to bring more plants, animals, and water to areas which have endured drought. When trees are brought to desert areas, they are able to help regenerate the water cycle there. This eventually brings vegetation which, in turn, filters the air, produces more oxygen, and reduces disease.

With the money that Ecosia has raised so far, they have been able to help plant more than 6 million trees all across the world. They’ve also donated millions of dollars to European and African forestry programs. By 2020, Ecosia wants to plant at least 1 billion trees across the world. The Sahel desert has already begun turning back into a forest because of Ecosia and their effort.

Image Credit: Joël Tettamanti and Bertrand Trichet

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

María Paula Falla, artista Arttextum
María Paula Falla
Barbara Santos, artista Arttextum
Barbara Santos
Rossana Martinez, artista Arttextum
Rossana Martínez

Couple Spends 26 Years Replanting a Rainforest, Here’s What It Looks Like Today

By: Themindcircle
Via: Themindcircle

The only wild life sanctuary in India was owned by Anil Malhorta and her wife, Pamela Gale Malhorta and it was named SAI sanctuary. It was founded in 1991and ever since then, they have been protecting and replanting forests and wildlife. As of now, the sanctuary are home to more than 200 endangered species of plant and animals which covers over 300 acres of wildlife including Asian elephants and Bengal tigers.

wildlife-forest-protection-arttextum-replicacion1.jpg

wildlife-forest-protection-arttextum-replicacion2.jpg

The land was an abandoned lands when they first came here, it took them a lot of care, energy, time and years to bring the sanctuary into existence as it was an abandoned rice fields, coffee, and cardamom fields where deforestation has taken place.

wildlife-forest-arttextum-replicacion4.jpg

wildlife-forest-protection-arttextum-replicacion5.jpg

In 1970s, the forest cover of the area where is located i.e. Kodagu district in India has experienced a dramatic overturn in forest cover from compared to today from 86% to 16%. It was told by Pamela that this is as result of disastrous effects of water supply and rainfall in the whole south of India.

wildlife-forest-arttextum-replicacion8.jpg

wildlife-forest-arttextum-replicacion9.jpg

The couple is trying hard to make sure that the environment provides shelter for the animals, and through that, the animal will keep the forest healthy. Pamela explained that along with her husband, they are satisfied and happy with what they are doing as nothing more cold make them more happy.

wildlife-forest-protection-arttextum-replicacion10.jpg

wildlife-forest-protection-arttextum-replicacion12.jpg

wildlife-forest-protection-arttextum-replicacion13.jpg

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

María Paula Falla, artista Arttextum
María Paula Falla
Barbara Santos, artista Arttextum
Barbara Santos
Rossana Martinez, artista Arttextum
Rossana Martínez

 

A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity (2016) – Free Full Documentary

A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity (2016) – Free Full Documentary

 

By: Happen Films
Via YouTube | June 3, 2016

Video recommended by Mick Lorusso from the US/Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

 A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity is a free feature-length documentary that follows a community in Australia who came together to explore and demonstrate a simpler way to live in response to global crises.
arttextum-replicacion-crisis-as-opportunity.png
Throughout the year the group build tiny houses, plant veggie gardens, practice simple living, and discover the challenges of living in community. This film is the product of hours and hours of footage that I shot during that year-long experiment in simple living. The documentary includes interviews with David Holmgren, Helena Norberg-Hodge, Nicole Foss, Ted Trainer, Graham Turner, and more.

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Jean-François Boclé, artista Arttextum
Jean-François Boclé
Regina José Galindo, artista Arttextum
Regina José Galindo
Mick Lorusso, artista Arttextum
Mick Lorusso

 

art_life_ny on #body #environment #health #kindness #nutrition #wellness

Rossana Martínez, artista Arttextum

Autor: Rossana Martínez
Vía Instagram

 

Get your daily inspiration from Arttextum’s artist Rossana Martínez, an active and extremely enthusiastic woman who has a lot to share. Here is a quote from her website:

I started mine more than ten years ago when I got tired of feeling tired all the time. “Tired of tired” is what motivated me to try.

To be clear, this is not a five or ten year plan. This is not a diet or training for a race. This is not for a specific age. This is the marathon of life. 
The action of taking time to simply try is the way to get there. And with a clear understanding that we, individually, will shape that healthy lifestyle.

Don’t forget to follow her on Instagram!!!

.

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


More about the artist:

Rossana Martinez, artista Arttextum
Rossana Martínez