Hombre maneja por horas en sequía para darle agua a todos los animales salvajes que lo necesitan

Autor: Elena Cortés
Vía Upsocl | Febrero 21, 2017

 

“Si no los ayudo se van a morir”.

Se llama Patrick Kilonzo Mwalua, y uno de sus objetivos de vida es ayudar a los animales. Este hombre se enrumba en una aventura de horas y en sequía solamente para llevarle agua a los animales salvajes del Tsavo West Nacional Park en Kenia. Lleva consigo más de 3 mil galones de agua por día porque el lugar donde habitan todas estas jirafas, zebras, elefantes, etc, es totalmente seco. Para él es una pasión.

Patrick Kilonozo Mwalua es un granjero en su pueblo y ha visto durante su vida el efecto del calentamiento global, sobre todo el impacto que tiene en la vida animal de Kenia.

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“Estábamos acostumbrados a recibir el agua por las lluvias, pero ya no está pasando eso. Así que comencé a darles agua a los animales por mi propia cuenta”.

El hombre confiesa que lo hace porque no quiere que estos indefensos animales mueran.

Todos los días, Patrick maneja por horas en sequía para llenar los tanques de agua y llevarlos a los animales.

Cada día llega con un camión de 3 mil galones de agua fresca, y los animales rápidamente se unen a él.

“No hay agua y es por eso que desgraciadamente los animales dependen de nosotros”

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Contó que una vez encontró a 500 búfalos esperando la manguera que les provee agua. Apenas llegó, los animalitos se emocionaron.

Esta pasión ha inspirado a un par de mujeres americanas que crearon páginas GoFundMe para apoyarlo.

Patrick promete seguir haciendo esto mientras que la vida se lo siga permitiendo.

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Michael Franti & Spearhead – Good to Be Alive Today

Michael Franti & Spearhead – Good to Be Alive Today

Authors: Dwayne Chin-Quee, Michael Franti, Stephen Mcgregor
Via YouTube May 29, 2016

Video recommended by Mick Lorusso from the US/Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

Michael Franti & Spearhead – Good to Be Alive Today.

Michael Franti & Spearhead – Good to Be Alive Today

It’s a long road, oh
Everyday I wake up and turn my phone on
I read the news of the day, just as it’s coming down
I do my best not to let it get me down
I try to keep my head up, but is Babylon
This world’s in crisis, we try to fight it, this changing climate
With scientists and politicians divided by it
So many ways we could solve it but they would never sign it
This mountains tumbling down, but still we try to climb it
It’s in the Torah, Quran and in the Bible
Love is the message for some how we turn to rivals
It’s come to people always picking up their rifles
Another school getting shot up homicidal

Some people tryna look fly, some people tryna get high
Some people losing their mind, some people tryna get by
And when you look in my eyes, you see the sign of the times
We all looking for the same thing

But what if this song’s number one
Would it mean that love had won?
Would it mean that the world was saved?
And no guns are being drawn today?
What if everybody had a job?
And nobody had to break a law?
What if everyone could say
That it’s good to be alive today (oh, oh, oh, oh)
Is it good to be alive today (oh, oh, oh, oh)
Is it good to be alive today (oh, oh, oh, oh)
Is it good to be alive today (oh, oh, oh, oh)
No matter what nobody say

People used to feel safer when they would hear a siren
Like help is on its way but now they only think of violence
Another youth in the streets and police is in a conflict
And now they hear the guns click, yo
Ebola crisis and ISIS is taking heads off
A drone is bombing a village and now the kids all
Signing up to be soldiers, but they all willing now
To do the killing now, now are you willing now?
Some politicians out there making up some problems
And tryna tell the people that they can solve them
With TV shows and soundbites and quotes
But everybody knows that it’s all about the cash flow
They telling you and me, they’re making progress
But tell it to the millions of jobless
It’s like a players club with billions of dollars
To get the votes you got to make it rain in congress

Some people tryna look fly, some people tryna get high
Some people losing their mind, some people tryna get by
And when you look in my eyes, you see the sign of the times
We all looking for the same thing

But what if this song’s number one
Would it mean that love had won?
Would it mean that the world was saved?
And no guns are being drawn today?
What if everybody had a job?
And nobody had to break a law?
What if everyone could say
That it’s good to be alive today (oh, oh, oh, oh)
Is it good to be alive today (oh, oh, oh, oh)
Is it good to be alive today (oh, oh, oh, oh)
Is it good to be alive today (oh, oh, oh, oh)
And we all say

One day, one day
One day, one day
One day, we all will say
That it’s good to be alive today
One day, one day
One day, one day
One day, we all will say
That it’s good to be alive today

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John Wheeler’s Participatory Universe

Autor: Marina Jones
Vía futurism | February 13, 2014

Besides his extraordinary contributions to the field of theoretical physics, Wheeler inspired many aspiring young scientists, including some of the greats of the 20th century. Among his doctoral students were Richard Feynman, a Nobel Prize laureate, with whom he coauthored the “Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory”; Hugh Everett, who proposed the many worlds interpretation; Kip Thorne, who predicted the existence of red supergiant stars with neutron-star cores; Jacob Bekenstein, who formulated black hole thermodynamics; Charles Misner, who discovered a mathematical spacetime called Misner space; Arthur Wightman, the originator of Wightman axioms; and Benjamin Schumacher, who invented the term “qubit” and is known for the “Schumacher compression”. The list could go on.

Wheeler had a reputation pushing his students into a place where logical thought would not necessarily take them. Former student Richard Feynman, to Kip Thorne, declared, “Some people think that Wheeler’s gotten crazy in his later years, but he’s always been crazy![Reference: Princeton] Wheeler was willing to make a fool of himself, to go anywhere, talk to anybody, and ask any question that would get him closer to understanding “how things are put together.” 

LEGACY:

Wheeler believed that the real reason universities have students is to educate the professors. But to be educated by the students, a professor had to ask good questions. “You try out your questions on the students”, he wrote, “If there are questions that the students get interested in, then they start to tell you new things and keep you asking more new questions. Pretty soon you have learned a great deal.” [Reference: Cosmic Search Vol. 1 No. 4]

Wheeler had a fantastic sense of humor. Often he engaged in Koan-like expressions that puzzled and amused his listeners. He saw beauty in strangeness and actively sought it out. He declared, “If you haven’t found something strange during the day, it hasn’t been much of a day.”

Wheeler divided his own life into three parts. The first part he called “Everything is Particles.” The second part was “Everything is Fields.” And the third part, which Wheeler considered the bedrock of his physical theory, he called “Everything is Information.”

EVERYTHING IS PARTICLES:

John Archilald Wheeler was born on July 9, 1911, in Jacksonville, Florida, into a family of librarians. At 16, he won a scholarship to Johns Hopkins University. He graduated five years later with a Ph.D in physics. A year later he got engaged to Janette Hegner. They stayed married for 72 years.

Source UnknownIn 1933 in an application for the National Research Council Fellowship to go to Copenhagen and work with Neils Bohr, Wheeler wrote: “I want to go to work with Neils Bohr because he sees further than any man alive.” Bohr and Wheeler published their first paper in the late 1930s, explaining nuclear fission in terms of quantum physics. They argued that the atomic nucleus, containing protons and neutrons, is like a drop of liquid, which starts vibrating and elongating into a peanut shape when a neutron emitted from another disintegrating nucleus collides with it. As a result, the peanut shaped atomic nucleus snaps into two.

In 1938 Wheeler started teaching at Princeton University. In 1941 he interrupted his academic work to join the Manhattan Project team (which included the likes of Feynman, Bohr and Albert Einstein – with Marie Curie helping lay out the blueprints) in building an atomic bomb. Wheeler considered it his duty to help with the war effort, but the atomic bomb wasn’t ready in time to end the war and save his beloved brother, who died in Italy in 1944.

After the war ended, Wheeler returned to Princeton and taught Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which at a time was not considered a “respectable” field of physics. Wheeler’s classes were exciting – one of his tricks was to write on chalkboards with both hands. He frequently took his students to Albert Einstein’s house in Princeton for discussions over a cup of tea.

EVERYTHING IS FIELDS:

Wheeler co-wrote the most influential textbook on general relativity with Charles W. Misner and Kip Thorne. It was called Gravitation. While working on mathematical extensions to the theory, Wheeler described hypothetical “tunnels” in space-time which he called “wormholes”. He was not the first scientist to think of the possibility of wormholes, or even black holes, but he established the idea. In this regard, it’s worth noting that Democritus, an ancient Greek philosopher, suggested that matter was composed of atoms, which was “mainstreamed” by John Dalton’s discovery of atoms 2000 years later. In 1784, John Mitchell, a Yorkshire clergyman, suggested that light was subject to the force of gravity long before Einstein proved it.

After the publication of the theory of General Relativity in 1916, in which Albert Einstein predicted the existence of black holes, in 1967 John Wheeler named them. Nigel Calder calls them “awesome engines of quasars and active galaxies.” We now have multiple variations of the original concept: charged black holes, rotating black holes, stationary black holes, supermassive black holes, stellar black holes, miniature black holes.

EVERYTHING IS INFORMATION:

Let’s get to Wheeler’s three-part life- story, the last part he called “Everything is Information”.

In the final decades of his life, the question that intrigued Wheeler most was: “Are life and mind irrelevant to the structure of the universe, or are they central to it?” He suggested that the nature of reality was revealed by the bizarre laws of quantum mechanics. According to the quantum theory, before the observation is made, a subatomic particle exists in several states, called a superposition (or, as Wheeler called it, a ‘smoky dragon’). Once the particle is observed, it instantaneously collapses into a single position.

Wheeler suggested that reality is created by observers and that: “no phenomenon is a real phenomenon until it is an observed phenomenon.” He coined the termParticipatory Anthropic Principle (PAP) from the Greek “anthropos”, or human. He went further to suggest that “we are participants in bringing into being not only the near and here, but the far away and long ago.” [Reference: Radio Interview With Martin Redfern]

This claim was considered rather outlandish until his thought experiment, known as the “delayed-choice experiment,” was tested in a laboratory in 1984. This experiment was a variation on the famous “double-slit experiment” in which the dual nature of light was exposed (depending on how the experiment was measured and observed, the light behaved like a particle (a photon) or like a wave).

Unlike the original “double-slit experiment”, in Wheeler’s version, the method of detection was changed AFTER a photon had passed the double slit. The experiment showed that the path of the photon was not fixed until the physicists made their measurements. The results of this experiment, as well as another conducted in 2007, proved what Wheeler had always suspected – observers’ consciousness is required to bring the universe into existence. This means that a pre-life Earth would have existed in an undetermined state, and a pre-life universe could only exist retroactively.

A UNIVERSE ‘FINE-TUNED’ FOR LIFE:

These conclusions lead many scientists to speculate that the universe is fine-tuned for life. This is how Wheeler’s Princeton colleague, Robert Dicke, explained the existence of our universe:

“If you want an observer around, and if you want life, you need heavy elements. To make heavy elements out of hydrogen, you need thermonuclear combustion. To have thermonuclear combustion, you need a time of cooking in a star of several billion years. In order to stretch out several billion years in its time dimension, the universe, according to general relativity, must be several years across in its space dimensions. So why is the universe as big as it is? Because we are here!”

[Reference: Cosmic Search Vol. 1 No. 4]

Stephen Hawking has also noted: “The laws of science, as we know them at present, seem to have been very finely adjusted to make possible the development of life.” Fred Hoyle, in his book Intelligent Universe, compares “the chance of obtaining even a single functioning protein by a chance combination of amino acids to a star system full of blind men solving Rubik’s Cube simultaneously.”

Physicist Andrei Linde of Stanford University adds: “The universe and the observer exist as a pair. I cannot imagine a consistent theory of the universe that ignores consciousness.” [Reference: “Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the Universe“]

Wheeler, always an optimist, believed that one day we would have a clear understanding of the origin of the universe. He had “a sense of faith that it can be done.” “Faith”, he wrote, “is the number one element. It isn’t something that spreads itself uniformly. Faith is concentrated in few people at particular times and places. If you can involve young people in an atmosphere of hope and faith, then I think they’ll figure out how to get the answer.”

CONCLUSION:

Wheeler died of pneumonia on April 13, 2008, at age 96. His whole life he searched for answers to philosophical questions about the origin of matter, the nature of information and the universe. “We are no longer satisfied with insights into particles, or fields of force, or geometry, or even space and time,” he wrote in 1981, “Today we demand of physics some understanding of existence itself.”  [Reference: “The Voice of Genius: Conversations with Nobel Scientists and Other Luminaries”]

Let’s hope that young scientists will continue to be encouraged by these words and will push the boundaries of human imagination beyond its limits, and maybe even find the elusive final theory – a Theory of Everything.

John Archibald Wheeler (1911-2008) was a scientist-philosopher who introduced the concept of wormholes and coined the term “black hole”. He pioneered the theory of nuclear fission with Niels Bohr and introduced the S-matrix (the scattering matrix used in quantum mechanics). Wheeler devised a concept of quantum foam; a theory of “virtual particles” popping in and out of existence in space (similarly, he conceptualized foam as the foundation of the fabric of the universe).

Imagen destacada: How It Works

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The Sun, Full HD Documentary

The Sun

By: Discovery Communications Inc.
Via YouTube | May 17, 2014

Video recommended by Mick Lorusso from the US/Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

 

“The realization that we came from the stars is one of the greatest discoveries ever in all of science.”

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The Mystery of Water – What we know is a drop

Directors: Gundi Lamprecht & Hans Kronberger
Via YouTube | Published on Sep 14, 2012 / Originally created in 2008

 

Water burns? Water has a memory? Water can be affected by cell phones? It seems that there is much more to know about water than what we are taught about in science class at school. In this video you will learn about how water is affected by electricity and microwaves and that the water will carry that information and pass it along to other water. You will learn about an Austrian inventor by the name of John Grander who invented a way to “revitalize” dead water.

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What’s invisible? More than you think – John Lloyd

Author: John Lloyd / TEDTalk
Via http://ed.ted.com | Published on Sep 26, 2012 / TEDTalk from 2009

 

Let’s Begin…

Gravity. The stars in day. Thoughts. The human genome. Time. Atoms. So much of what really matters in the world is impossible to see. A stunning animation of John Lloyd’s classic TEDTalk from 2009, which will make you question what you actually know..
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Un libro de colorear que homenajea la belleza natural de la proporción áurea

Un libro de colorear que homenajea la belleza natural de la proporción áurea

Autor: mymodernmet
Vía Cultura Inquieta | Abril 23, 2016

Artículo recomendado por Karla Castillo, colaboradora de México para Replicación de Arttextum

 

Las ilustraciones de Proporción Áurea dibujadas a mano por Rafael Araujo son una hermosa fusión del arte con la ciencia. Durante los últimos 40 años, el arquitecto e ilustrador venezolano ha estado perfeccionando sus sorprendentes dibujos, todos conectados por ese hilo conductor.

Armado de lápiz, compás, regla, transportador de ángulos y nada más, crea dibujos que representan la brillantez matemática del mundo natural y recientemente ha comenzado a recopilar versiones de sus mejores trabajos en un libro de colorear para adultos que busca el reencuentro de los seres humanos con la naturaleza.

Las ilustraciones de Araujo giran en torno a los inteligentes patrones de crecimiento gobernados por la Proporción Áurea. Este número especial, comúnmente anotado con la letra griega Phi (φ), es igual a 1,618 y se puede observar en todo tipo de espirales naturales, secuencias y proporciones.

“Phyllotaxis” es como se denomina  la tendencia de las cosas orgánicas a crecer en patrones en espiral y este patrón numérico se repite tan a menudo en la naturaleza que algunos investigadores lo han considerado una norma universal de perfección de estructuras, formas y proporciones.

Desde conchas de mar, hojas, cristales, e incluso alas de mariposa, podemos rastrear el número Phi a lo largo de nuestro entorno, una y otra vez.

Aplicar la Proporción Áurea a sus dibujos y dejar las líneas de construcción en las imágenes finales, permite a Araujo crear diseños que claramente gravitan alrededor de este marco matemático. Cada composición es cuidadosamente detallada y puede llevar hasta 100 horas al artista completar una sola de ellas.

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Leidenfrost effect- really cool maze of moving droplets at end

Leidenfrost effect- really cool maze of moving droplets at end

Author: SciFri
Via: Science Friday | November 21, 2013

Video recommended by Mick Lorusso from the USA / Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

In the Leidenfrost Effect, a water droplet will float on a layer of its own vapor if heated to certain temperature. This common cooking phenomenon takes center stage in a series of playful experiments by physicists at the University of Bath, who discovered new and fun means to manipulate the movement of water.

Researchers test ridged surfaces in order to control the movements of hot water.

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This Is How Sand Looks Magnified Up To 300 Times

Author: Lina D.
Via Bored Panda

 

Comparing something to a grain of sand is usually supposed to mean that it’s small or insignificant, but Dr. Gary Greenberg’s microscopic photography aims to turn this stereotype on its head. His photographs of minuscule grains of sands magnified up to 300 times reveal that each grain of sand can be beautiful and unique.

Greenberg’s story is a fascinating one. First of all, he invented the high-definition 3D microscopes that he takes his pictures on, resulting in 18 U.S. patents under his name. He was a photographer and filmmaker until age 33, when he moved from LA to London and earned a Ph.D. in biomedical research. This seems to have given him a unique appreciation for biological and scientific curiosities and for the optical technologies he would need to document them.

sand-grains-under-microscope-arttextum2

Sand composition can vary drastically depending on where it’s located. The coastal sands in Hawaii, where Dr. Greenberg is located, are very likely the subjects of his amazing micro-photography. The sand in his images is full of remnants from various tropical sea organisms large and small. The sand on other coasts, depending on the temperature, surf conditions and marine environment, may include a totally different set of rocks, minerals and organic matter.

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