La magia trazada en cielo, tierra y mar

La magia trazada en cielo, tierra y mar

Autor: José Daniel Peraza
Vía Instagram @jdpc03 | Marzo 2018

Imagen recomendada por Cindy Elizondo, colaboradora de Costa Rica para Replicación de Arttextum

Nuestra colaboradora Cindy Elizondo nos ha compartido esta fotografía de este gran fotógrafo costarricense. Sigue al autor en Instagram (@jdpc03) y descubre más.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Gianine Tabja, artista Arttextum
Gianine Tabja
Alejandro Jaime, artista Arttextum
Alejandro Jaime
Glenda León, artista Arttextum
Glenda León

Is the Universe Conscious?

Author: Corey S. Powell
Via NBC News| June 16, 2017

Some of the world’s most renowned scientists are questioning whether the cosmos has an inner life similar to our own.

For centuries, modern science has been shrinking the gap between humans and the rest of the universe, from Isaac Newton showing that one set of laws applies equally to falling apples and orbiting moons to Carl Sagan intoning that “we are made of star stuff” — that the atoms of our bodies were literally forged in the nuclear furnaces of other stars.

Even in that context, Gregory Matloff’s ideas are shocking. The veteran physicist at New York City College of Technology recently published a paper arguing that humans may be like the rest of the universe in substance and in spirit. A “proto-consciousness field” could extend through all of space, he argues. Stars may be thinking entities that deliberately control their paths. Put more bluntly, the entire cosmos may be self-aware.

The notion of a conscious universe sounds more like the stuff of late night TV than academic journals. Called by its formal academic name, though, “panpsychism” turns out to have prominent supporters in a variety of fields. New York University philosopher and cognitive scientist David Chalmers is a proponent. So too, in different ways, are neuroscientist Christof Koch of the Allen Institute for Brain Science, and British physicist Sir Roger Penrose, renowned for his work on gravity and black holes. The bottom line, Matloff argues, is that panpsychism is too important to ignore.

“It’s all very speculative, but it’s something we can check and either validate or falsify,” he says.

Three decades ago, Penrose introduced a key element of panpsychism with his theory that consciousness is rooted in the statistical rules of quantum physics as they apply in the microscopic spaces between neurons in the brain.

In 2006, German physicist Bernard Haisch, known both for his studies of active stars and his openness to unorthodox science, took Penrose’s idea a big step further. Haisch proposed that the quantum fields that permeate all of empty space (the so-called “quantum vacuum”) produce and transmit consciousness, which then emerges in any sufficiently complex system with energy flowing through it. And not just a brain, but potentially any physical structure. Intrigued, Matloff wondered if there was a way to take these squishy arguments and put them to an observational test.

One of the hallmarks of life is its ability to adjust its behavior in response to stimulus. Matloff began searching for astronomical objects that unexpectedly exhibit this behavior. Recently, he zeroed in on a little-studied anomaly in stellar motion known as Paranego’s Discontinuity. On average, cooler stars orbit our galaxy more quickly than do hotter ones. Most astronomers attribute the effect to interactions between stars and gas clouds throughout the galaxy. Matloff considered a different explanation. He noted that the anomaly appears in stars that are cool enough to have molecules in their atmospheres, which greatly increases their chemical complexity.

Matloff noted further that some stars appear to emit jets that point in only one direction, an unbalanced process that could cause a star to alter its motion. He wondered: Could this actually be a willful process? Is there any way to tell?

If Paranego’s Discontinuity is caused by specific conditions within the galaxy, it should vary from location to location. But if it is something intrinsic to the stars — as consciousness would be — it should be the same everywhere. Data from existing stellar catalogs seems to support the latter view, Matloff claims. Detailed results from the Gaia star-mapping space telescope, due in 2018, will provide a more stringent test.

Matloff is under no illusion that his colleagues will be convinced, but he remains upbeat: “Shouldn’t we at least be checking? Maybe we can move panpsychism from philosophy to observational astrophysics.”

MIND OUT OF MATTER

While Matloff looks out to the stars to verify panpsychism, Christof Koch looks at humans. In his view, the existence of widespread, ubiquitous consciousness is strongly tied to scientists’ current understanding of the neurological origins of the mind.

“The only dominant theory we have of consciousness says that it is associated with complexity — with a system’s ability to act upon its own state and determine its own fate,” Koch says. “Theory states that it could go down to very simple systems. In principle, some purely physical systems that are not biological or organic may also be conscious.”

Koch is inspired by integrated information theory, a hot topic among modern neuroscientists, which holds that consciousness is defined by the ability of a system to be influenced by its previous state and to influence its next state.

The human brain is just an extreme example of that process, Koch explains: “We are more complex, we have more self-awareness — well, some of us do — but other systems have awareness, too. We may share this property of experience, and that is what consciousness is: the ability to experience anything, from the most mundane to the most refined religious experience.”

Like Matloff, Koch and his colleagues are actively engaged in experimental tests of these ideas. One approach is to study brain-impaired patients to see if their information responses align with biological measures of their consciousness. Another approach, further off, is to wire the brains of two mice together and see how the integrated consciousness of the animals changes as the amount of information flowing between them is increased. At some point, according to integrated information theory, the two should merge into a single, larger information system. Eventually, it should be possible to run such experiments with humans, wiring their brains together to see if a new type of consciousness emerges.

Despite their seeming similarities, Koch is dubious of Matloff’s volitional stars. What is distinctive about living things, according to his theory, is not that they are alive but that they are complex. Although the sun is vastly bigger than a bacterium, from a mathematical perspective it is also vastly simpler. Koch allows that a star may have an internal life that allows it to “feel,” but whatever that feeling is, it is much less than the feeling of being an E. coli.

On the other hand, “even systems that we don’t consider animate could have a little bit of consciousness,” Koch says. “It is part and parcel of the physical.” From this perspective, the universe may not exactly be thinking, but it still has an internal experience intimately tied to our own.

A PARTICIPATORY COSMOS

Which brings us to Roger Penrose and his theories linking consciousness and quantum mechanics. He does not overtly identify himself as a panpsychist, but his argument that self-awareness and free will begin with quantum events in the brain inevitably links our minds with the cosmos. Penrose sums up this connection beautifully in his opus “The Road to Reality”:

“The laws of physics produce complex systems, and these complex systems lead to consciousness, which then produces mathematics, which can then encode in a succinct and inspiring way the very underlying laws of physics that gave rise to it.”

Despite his towering stature as a physicist, Penrose has encountered resistance to his theory of consciousness. Oddly, his colleagues have been more accepting of the exotic, cosmic-consciousness implications of quantum mechanics. Ever since the 1920s, physicists have puzzled over the strangely privileged role of the observer in quantum theory. A particle exists in a fuzzy state of uncertainty…but only until it is observed. As soon as someone looks at it and takes its measurements, the particle seems to collapse into a definite location.

The late physicist John Wheeler concluded that the apparent oddity of quantum mechanics was built on an even grander and odder truth: that the universe as a whole festers in a state of uncertainty and snaps into clear, actual being when observed by a conscious being — that is, us.

“We are participators in bringing into being not only the near and here but the far away and long ago,” Wheeler said in 2006. He calls his interpretation the “participatory anthropic principle.” If he is correct, the universe is conscious, but in almost the opposite of the way that Matloff pictures it: Only through the acts of conscious minds does it truly exist at all.

It is hard to imagine how a scientist could put the participatory anthropic principle to an empirical test. There are no stars to monitor, and no brains to measure, to understand whether reality depends on the presence of consciousness. Even if it cannot be proven, the participatory anthropic principle extends the unifying agenda of modern science, powerfully evoking the sense of connectedness that Albert Einstein called the cosmic religious feeling.

“In my view, it is the most important function of art and science to awaken this feeling and keep it alive in those who are receptive to it,” Einstein wrote in a 1930 New York Times editorial. Explorers like Matloff are routinely dismissed as fringe thinkers, but it is hard to think of any greater expression of that feeling than continuing the quest to find out if our human minds are just tiny components of a much greater cosmic brain.

Images: NASA via Reuters

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists

Mick Lorusso, artista Arttextum
Mick Lorusso
Ivelisse Jiménez, artista Arttextum
Ivelisse Jiménez
Gilberto Esparza, artista Arttextum
Gilberto Esparza

Arquitecto croata diseña un órgano que convierte las olas del mar en música

Autor: Jose M. Taboada
Vía TysMagazine | Noviembre 20, 2015

 

El arquitecto croata Nikola Bašić creó un impresionante órgano marino que traduce las olas del mar en una relajante música.

‘Morse Orgulje’, lo que se puede traducir como ‘órgano majestuoso’, fue diseñado  por este arquitecto en 2005. Es la estrella indiscutible de la ciudad de Zadar en Croacia. Un espectáculo increíble. Los canales de este órgano conectan 35 tubos, cada uno conectado a su vez a diferentes cadenas musicales. Así obtiene de forma natural los sonidos. Las notas que desprende son puramente aleatorias, dependen de como las olas imparten contra el órgano.

Con este diseño, el arquitecto croata ganó el premio ex aequo de la cuarta edición del Premio Europeo del Espacio Público Urbano.

Inspirado en un pequeño instrumento griego de nombre hydraulis, y con el antecedente de la creación del Wave Organ en la ciudad de San Francisco en 1986, este órgano de mar posee 70 metros de largo,  fabricado en su totalidad de hormigón y con unos escalones en mármol.

Sus 35 tubos generan de forma precisa una nota distinta provocada con el movimiento de las olas y la energía del viento. Cada tubo atraviesa la estructura y hace contacto con el mar Adriático, mientras que en la parte de arriba veremos pequeños orificios, que en conjunto crean una melodía sorprendente e ideal para perder la vista en el horizonte, o simplemente un placer para nuestros sentidos.

Aquí puedes ver y oir este impresionante instrumento-escultura:

y sí sólo quieres oír su sonido…

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Máximo Corvalán-Pincheira, artista Arttextum
Máximo Corvalán-Pincheira
Gilberto Esparza, artista Arttextum
Gilberto Esparza
Leonel Vásquez, artista Arttextum
Leonel Vásquez

9 juegos de relajación para criar niños emocionalmente fuertes

Autora: Raquel Aldana
Vía La mente es maravillosa | Enero 8, 2017

 

En una época en la que se usan las tablets para calmar a los niños, se hace más indispensable si cabe entrenar a nuestros pequeños en técnicas de relajación. Podemos hacerlo por medio de juegos para que, a la vez que desarrollan recursos para la vida, se diviertan.

Así, teniendo en cuenta que vivimos en una sociedad que fomenta la prisa, los estímulos rápidos y la gratificación inmediata, es de suma importancia que tengamos a mano recursos que favorezcan un mayor autocontrol.

Por eso, basándonos en esta premisa, en este artículo hemos recopilado algunos juegos que se constituyen como técnicas de relajación para los más pequeños de la familia. Veamos en qué consisten:

1.¡¡A soplar la vela!!

Este juego consiste en aprender a respirar de manera profunda, es decir, cogiendo aire por la nariz, inflando la barriga y expulsando poco a poco el aire mientras soplamos la vela con intención de apagarla. Una vez que están comprendidas las instrucciones, situamos al niño en una silla a dos metros de la vela, que se encontrará encendida encima de una mesa.

No puede levantarse ni inclinarse, por lo que es esperable que no consiga apagarla. Así que lo acercaremos medio metro aproximadamente. Realizaremos acercamientos progresivos hasta que la apague. De esta manera tendremos un rato de juego de unos 5 minutos en el que el niño adquirirá la habilidad de respirar profundamente.

2.El juego del globo

La técnica del globo es un juego maravilloso que nos ayuda a fomentar la relajación a través de una correcta respiración. ¿Qué necesitamos? Un espacio amplio y globos de colores. ¿Qué debemos hacer? Inflar un globo tanto que explote e inflar otro globo y dejar que expulse el aire lentamente manipulando la boquilla.

Después, les pediremos a los niños que cierren sus ojos y se imaginen que se convierten en globos mientras toman aire. Luego, les solicitaremos que expulsen el aire lentamente, como si fueran globos.

Tras hacer esto pediremos a los niños que nos cuenten situaciones en las que se sienten como globos, situaciones en las que no pueden soportar o tolerar algo. Entonces, les invitaremoss a que nos indiquen cómo lo han resuelto, ofreciendo alternativas si necesitasen ayuda para tomar conciencia de esas situaciones.

3.La relajación progresiva

Si bien podemos darles nosotros las instrucciones, en youtube tenemos un vídeo estupendo basado en el texto original de la relajación de Koeppen que narra las instrucciones de relajación con una fantástica música de fondo cortesía de Salvador Candel. No obstante, cabe decir que las instrucciones también podemos dárselas nosotros, ambientando la situación con música relajante que favorezca un entorno cálido y sosegado.

Como nota adicional, cabe decir que para favorecer que generalicen este tipo de relajación en contextos más “naturales” como el colegio, podemos decirles que si se ponen nerviosos en clase, agarren la silla mientras están sentados y tensen los brazos y el tronco al mismo tiempo que hacen fuerza con los pies en el suelo.

4.El juego de la semilla

Con música relajante de fondo y luz tenue, simbolizaremos el crecimiento de un árbol. Comenzaremos por ponernos de rodillas en el suelo con la cabeza agachada y los brazos extendidos hacia adelante, como si fuésemos gatitos desperezándose.

Somos una semilla que, al son de la música, va creciendo y convirtiéndose en un árbol grande con hermosas ramas, que serán nuestros brazos extendidos hacia arriba cuando estemos de pie. Este ejercicio es ideal para hacerlo con ellos por la noche, antes de acostarlos.

5.El cuento de la tortuga

El cuento de la tortuga, desarrollado por Schneider, es magnífico para fomentar habilidades de autocontrol. En el enlace se narra la historia de una pequeña tortuga que se enfadaba por todo y explotaba con gran facilidad.

Un día, tras sentirse sola y aislada, se encuentra con una sabia tortuga que le da un truquito para controlarse cuando se enfada: meterse en su caparazón, contar hasta calmarse, frenar sus pensamientos y relajarse.

Este cuento es ideal para narrarlo a niños entre los 3 y los 7 años. Para favorecer la puesta en práctica de esta habilidad podemos darles una pegatina o un papelito con una tortuga cada vez que realicen el ejercicio en una situación de tensión. Lo tenemos descargable y listo para imprimir en este enlace.

6.El frasco de la calma

Llamamos frasco de la calma a un bote en el que metemos agua, silicona líquida para dar densidad al contenido y, por ejemplo, purpurina. Podemos fabricarlo con ellos con una manualidad más y es ideal para que lo contemplen tanto en momentos de tensión como en momentos que podemos llamar “zen”.

Consiste en que lo agiten y observen el movimiento, después de ello les explicaremos que la purpurina es como sus emociones, que se agitan y agitan hasta que se tranquilizan. Es ideal para fomentar la reflexividad.

La sola observación de la purpurina moviéndose lentamente les ayudará a concentrarse y relajar su mente tras momentos de gran activación. Os dejamos un enlace en el que se explica cómo fabricarlo y cómo usarlo. ¡¡No olvidéis sellar el bote con pegamento extrafuerte para impedir que se abra y se desparrame el contenido!!

7.El juego del soplador de bola gigante

Otro recurso más para divertirse y aprender a respirar de manera profunda es el juego del soplador. Consiste en que mantengan durante el mayor tiempo posible la bola en el aire. Divertido, ¿verdad? Lo cierto es que este juego les encanta y es muy funcional para favorecer la relajación.

8.Arrugar papeles, aplastar bolas, garabatear

Garabatear, arrugar papeles o aplastar bolas blanditas tipo anti-estrés es otro juego maravilloso para ayudarles a canalizar sus emociones negativas. Además, al mismo tiempo favorecemos el desarrollo de la motricidad fina, ya que les ayudamos a fortalecer los músculos de sus pequeñas manos.

9.Pintar mandalas

Pintar mandalas no solo favorece la relajación y la reflexividad, sino la capacidad de concentración y la habilidad creativa. En librerías y en internet encontramos numerosas alternativas adecuadas para ellos que les encantarán.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Paulina Velázquez Solís, artista Arttextum
Paulina Velázquez Solís
Rita Ponce de León, artista Arttextum
Rita Ponce de León
Johanna Villamil, artista Arttextum
Johanna Villamil