Hayao Miyazaki: What You Can Imagine

By: JD Thompson
Via YouTube | September 4, 2016

This is a brief analysis of animator filmmaker, Hayao Miyazaki.

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El científico más innovador del que jamás oíste hablar

Autor: TED-Ed
Vía YouTube | Octubre 1, 2013

El geólogo danés del siglo XVII, Nicolás Sténon, se ganó la vida a temprana edad, estudiando cadáveres y estableciendo conexiones anatómicas entre las especies.

arttextum-replicacion-innovador.png

Sténon hizo aportes descomunales en el campo de la geología, influyendo en Charles Lyell, James Hutton y Charles Darwin. Addison Anderson relata el legado poco conocido de Sténon y alaba su insistencia en el empirismo sobre la teoría ciega.

Lección de Addison Anderson, animación de Anton Bogaty.

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John Wheeler’s Participatory Universe

Autor: Marina Jones
Vía futurism | February 13, 2014

Besides his extraordinary contributions to the field of theoretical physics, Wheeler inspired many aspiring young scientists, including some of the greats of the 20th century. Among his doctoral students were Richard Feynman, a Nobel Prize laureate, with whom he coauthored the “Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory”; Hugh Everett, who proposed the many worlds interpretation; Kip Thorne, who predicted the existence of red supergiant stars with neutron-star cores; Jacob Bekenstein, who formulated black hole thermodynamics; Charles Misner, who discovered a mathematical spacetime called Misner space; Arthur Wightman, the originator of Wightman axioms; and Benjamin Schumacher, who invented the term “qubit” and is known for the “Schumacher compression”. The list could go on.

Wheeler had a reputation pushing his students into a place where logical thought would not necessarily take them. Former student Richard Feynman, to Kip Thorne, declared, “Some people think that Wheeler’s gotten crazy in his later years, but he’s always been crazy![Reference: Princeton] Wheeler was willing to make a fool of himself, to go anywhere, talk to anybody, and ask any question that would get him closer to understanding “how things are put together.” 

LEGACY:

Wheeler believed that the real reason universities have students is to educate the professors. But to be educated by the students, a professor had to ask good questions. “You try out your questions on the students”, he wrote, “If there are questions that the students get interested in, then they start to tell you new things and keep you asking more new questions. Pretty soon you have learned a great deal.” [Reference: Cosmic Search Vol. 1 No. 4]

Wheeler had a fantastic sense of humor. Often he engaged in Koan-like expressions that puzzled and amused his listeners. He saw beauty in strangeness and actively sought it out. He declared, “If you haven’t found something strange during the day, it hasn’t been much of a day.”

Wheeler divided his own life into three parts. The first part he called “Everything is Particles.” The second part was “Everything is Fields.” And the third part, which Wheeler considered the bedrock of his physical theory, he called “Everything is Information.”

EVERYTHING IS PARTICLES:

John Archilald Wheeler was born on July 9, 1911, in Jacksonville, Florida, into a family of librarians. At 16, he won a scholarship to Johns Hopkins University. He graduated five years later with a Ph.D in physics. A year later he got engaged to Janette Hegner. They stayed married for 72 years.

Source UnknownIn 1933 in an application for the National Research Council Fellowship to go to Copenhagen and work with Neils Bohr, Wheeler wrote: “I want to go to work with Neils Bohr because he sees further than any man alive.” Bohr and Wheeler published their first paper in the late 1930s, explaining nuclear fission in terms of quantum physics. They argued that the atomic nucleus, containing protons and neutrons, is like a drop of liquid, which starts vibrating and elongating into a peanut shape when a neutron emitted from another disintegrating nucleus collides with it. As a result, the peanut shaped atomic nucleus snaps into two.

In 1938 Wheeler started teaching at Princeton University. In 1941 he interrupted his academic work to join the Manhattan Project team (which included the likes of Feynman, Bohr and Albert Einstein – with Marie Curie helping lay out the blueprints) in building an atomic bomb. Wheeler considered it his duty to help with the war effort, but the atomic bomb wasn’t ready in time to end the war and save his beloved brother, who died in Italy in 1944.

After the war ended, Wheeler returned to Princeton and taught Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which at a time was not considered a “respectable” field of physics. Wheeler’s classes were exciting – one of his tricks was to write on chalkboards with both hands. He frequently took his students to Albert Einstein’s house in Princeton for discussions over a cup of tea.

EVERYTHING IS FIELDS:

Wheeler co-wrote the most influential textbook on general relativity with Charles W. Misner and Kip Thorne. It was called Gravitation. While working on mathematical extensions to the theory, Wheeler described hypothetical “tunnels” in space-time which he called “wormholes”. He was not the first scientist to think of the possibility of wormholes, or even black holes, but he established the idea. In this regard, it’s worth noting that Democritus, an ancient Greek philosopher, suggested that matter was composed of atoms, which was “mainstreamed” by John Dalton’s discovery of atoms 2000 years later. In 1784, John Mitchell, a Yorkshire clergyman, suggested that light was subject to the force of gravity long before Einstein proved it.

After the publication of the theory of General Relativity in 1916, in which Albert Einstein predicted the existence of black holes, in 1967 John Wheeler named them. Nigel Calder calls them “awesome engines of quasars and active galaxies.” We now have multiple variations of the original concept: charged black holes, rotating black holes, stationary black holes, supermassive black holes, stellar black holes, miniature black holes.

EVERYTHING IS INFORMATION:

Let’s get to Wheeler’s three-part life- story, the last part he called “Everything is Information”.

In the final decades of his life, the question that intrigued Wheeler most was: “Are life and mind irrelevant to the structure of the universe, or are they central to it?” He suggested that the nature of reality was revealed by the bizarre laws of quantum mechanics. According to the quantum theory, before the observation is made, a subatomic particle exists in several states, called a superposition (or, as Wheeler called it, a ‘smoky dragon’). Once the particle is observed, it instantaneously collapses into a single position.

Wheeler suggested that reality is created by observers and that: “no phenomenon is a real phenomenon until it is an observed phenomenon.” He coined the termParticipatory Anthropic Principle (PAP) from the Greek “anthropos”, or human. He went further to suggest that “we are participants in bringing into being not only the near and here, but the far away and long ago.” [Reference: Radio Interview With Martin Redfern]

This claim was considered rather outlandish until his thought experiment, known as the “delayed-choice experiment,” was tested in a laboratory in 1984. This experiment was a variation on the famous “double-slit experiment” in which the dual nature of light was exposed (depending on how the experiment was measured and observed, the light behaved like a particle (a photon) or like a wave).

Unlike the original “double-slit experiment”, in Wheeler’s version, the method of detection was changed AFTER a photon had passed the double slit. The experiment showed that the path of the photon was not fixed until the physicists made their measurements. The results of this experiment, as well as another conducted in 2007, proved what Wheeler had always suspected – observers’ consciousness is required to bring the universe into existence. This means that a pre-life Earth would have existed in an undetermined state, and a pre-life universe could only exist retroactively.

A UNIVERSE ‘FINE-TUNED’ FOR LIFE:

These conclusions lead many scientists to speculate that the universe is fine-tuned for life. This is how Wheeler’s Princeton colleague, Robert Dicke, explained the existence of our universe:

“If you want an observer around, and if you want life, you need heavy elements. To make heavy elements out of hydrogen, you need thermonuclear combustion. To have thermonuclear combustion, you need a time of cooking in a star of several billion years. In order to stretch out several billion years in its time dimension, the universe, according to general relativity, must be several years across in its space dimensions. So why is the universe as big as it is? Because we are here!”

[Reference: Cosmic Search Vol. 1 No. 4]

Stephen Hawking has also noted: “The laws of science, as we know them at present, seem to have been very finely adjusted to make possible the development of life.” Fred Hoyle, in his book Intelligent Universe, compares “the chance of obtaining even a single functioning protein by a chance combination of amino acids to a star system full of blind men solving Rubik’s Cube simultaneously.”

Physicist Andrei Linde of Stanford University adds: “The universe and the observer exist as a pair. I cannot imagine a consistent theory of the universe that ignores consciousness.” [Reference: “Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the Universe“]

Wheeler, always an optimist, believed that one day we would have a clear understanding of the origin of the universe. He had “a sense of faith that it can be done.” “Faith”, he wrote, “is the number one element. It isn’t something that spreads itself uniformly. Faith is concentrated in few people at particular times and places. If you can involve young people in an atmosphere of hope and faith, then I think they’ll figure out how to get the answer.”

CONCLUSION:

Wheeler died of pneumonia on April 13, 2008, at age 96. His whole life he searched for answers to philosophical questions about the origin of matter, the nature of information and the universe. “We are no longer satisfied with insights into particles, or fields of force, or geometry, or even space and time,” he wrote in 1981, “Today we demand of physics some understanding of existence itself.”  [Reference: “The Voice of Genius: Conversations with Nobel Scientists and Other Luminaries”]

Let’s hope that young scientists will continue to be encouraged by these words and will push the boundaries of human imagination beyond its limits, and maybe even find the elusive final theory – a Theory of Everything.

John Archibald Wheeler (1911-2008) was a scientist-philosopher who introduced the concept of wormholes and coined the term “black hole”. He pioneered the theory of nuclear fission with Niels Bohr and introduced the S-matrix (the scattering matrix used in quantum mechanics). Wheeler devised a concept of quantum foam; a theory of “virtual particles” popping in and out of existence in space (similarly, he conceptualized foam as the foundation of the fabric of the universe).

Imagen destacada: How It Works

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El índice de sostenibilidad ambiental “Hecho en México”

Autor: Conacyt, Israel Pérez Valencia
Vía Conacytprensa | Agosto 22, 2017

Ante las diferentes problemáticas que enfrentan las ciudades y metrópolis por el crecimiento urbano, investigadores del Centro Interdisciplinario de Estudios Metropolitanos (Centromet) alistan un índice de sostenibilidad ambiental que busca abordar estos problemas en el marco de un contexto mexicano.

Los investigadores del Centromet a cargo de esta iniciativa son Citlalli Aideé Becerril Tinoco, Karol Yáñez Soria, Héctor Antonio Solano Lamphar y Fabricio Espinosa Ortiz, y abordarán temáticas como cambio climático, biodiversidad, contaminantes atmosféricos, residuos sólidos y peligrosos, así como legislación ambiental.

Al respecto, el profesor investigador Héctor Antonio Solano Lamphar informó que este proyecto de estudio del Centromet pretende abordar las temáticas más importantes de la sostenibilidad ambiental, en un primera etapa, a nivel teórico y presentar los resultados de este índice en un artículo y después en un libro.

“Buscamos que este índice de sostenibilidad ambiental sea distinto al que maneja la Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) y otros organismos gubernamentales, principalmente porque estamos abordando factores importantes, recopilación de datos y metodologías diseñadas en el contexto nacional, es decir, que no necesitan ser adecuadas a las realidades urbanas y heterogéneas de nuestro país”, aseguró.

Solano Lamphar destacó que en este primer acercamiento están colaborando cuatro investigadores especialistas del Centromet, con lo que se pretende establecer una discusión sobre las condiciones del país respecto a la sostenibilidad, que es un término que ha estado de moda pero que no suele usarse adecuadamente.

1 centyromet2208“En este primer acercamiento buscamos una discusión sobre el concepto, así como una incorporación de variables que nosotros consideramos las más coherentes para incorporarlas en un índice de sostenibilidad ambiental, como cambio climático, biodiversidad, contaminantes atmosféricos, residuos sólidos y peligrosos, así como legislación ambiental”, indicó.

Ciudades compactas y difusas

El investigador del Centromet puntualizó que la siguiente etapa de este índice de sostenibilidad ambiental es llevarlo a casos específicos, empezando por Querétaro y el Bajío, donde no solo se hagan los estudios sino que además se propongan soluciones e información accesible que sea de utilidad para tomadores de decisiones,  servidores públicos y ciudadanos en general.

“En lo que se refiere a la contaminación, que es mi área, se busca hacer una distinción entre las ciudades compactas y difusas, además del cómo contamina cada una de ellas. Por ejemplo, en Europa se tienen ciudades más compactas donde las personas viven en edificios, es decir, construyen hacia arriba, y donde se observa que son más controlables en lo que se refiere a vías de comunicación, son ciudades grandes pero pequeñas en extensión; sin embargo, dependiendo de los materiales con que se construyeron, la orografía y montañas que las rodean, se pueden concentrar más los aerosoles artificiales y naturales”, advirtió.

En el caso de las ciudades difusas, la mancha territorial se dispersa hacia los alrededores, hay ciudades dentro de las ciudades y, además de la contaminación, tienen problemáticas en lo que se refiere al acceso a los servicios o la calidad de las viviendas.

El agua en México

Por su parte, la investigadora del Centromet Citlalli Aideé Becerril Tinoco estudia el manejo y servicio de las aguas potables y tratadas en los niveles comunitario, ciudades y metrópolis.

“Tenemos casi tres años trabajando en el proyecto. El tema del agua es muy sensible a nivel nacional porque hay ciudades que están teniendo un crecimiento de manera exponencial en todos los sentidos. Por ejemplo, Querétaro se está expandiendo de manera muy acelerada, se han otorgado demasiadas concesiones a constructoras del mercado inmobiliario. Con ello no solo se expande la mancha urbana sino que la dotación de servicios es un reto, tomando en cuenta que se tiene que garantizar el agua potable al total de estas poblaciones”, sostuvo.

Becerril Tinoco detalló que ya cuenta con un diagnóstico a nivel nacional, que será el punto de partida para las líneas de investigación del índice de sostenibilidad ambiental.

1 centeo2208“Las líneas se enfocan en estudiar la disponibilidad de agua en lo general, el agua potable, la escasez hídrica y su relación con el crecimiento poblacional, estrés hídrico y vulnerabilidad de las ciudades por la falta de agua, ya sea por procesos naturales, como sequías, fallas en las redes, o por decisiones de autoridades tanto en zonas urbanas como en metrópolis. La falta de agua ya es un problema latente en todo el país, principalmente por el crecimiento desordenado en las ciudades”, subrayó.

Sostenibilidad urbana en México

En ese sentido, la investigadora del Centromet Karol Yáñez Soria desarrolla líneas de investigación dirigidas a hacer un análisis crítico y propuestas para la medición de la sostenibilidad urbana en México.

“Trabajé un proyecto en la Organización de las Naciones Unidas con un índice que mide la prosperidad urbana y la sostenibilidad ambiental, para identificar en el territorio las temáticas y poder aportar estrategias en tópicos como el agua, la generación y reciclaje de basura, sostenibilidad ambiental y gobernanza, ante los crecimientos no planeados de las ciudades que ha generado problemáticas como la urbanización en ecosistemas donde se lleva a cabo la captura de agua de los acuíferos”, advirtió.

La calidad de la vivienda

La siguiente línea de estudio propuesta para el índice de sostenibilidad ambiental del Centromet la desarrolla el investigador Fabricio Espinosa Ortiz, quien analiza las problemáticas de la vivienda en México, así como su relación con la calidad de vida de las personas en las ciudades y metrópolis.

“Existe una serie de variables en un estudio de este tipo, como son la valorización de la vivienda por parte de las personas, la adaptación de los espacios públicos, las características de la movilidad urbana en temas muy sensibles como lo es el transporte público y las diferentes estrategias que deben de seguirse para mejorarlos”, enumeró.

Espinosa Ortiz informó que el objetivo es entender la vivienda desde una perspectiva más allá de una simple unidad habitacional, observar cómo se relaciona con las aspiraciones y deseos de sus habitantes, así como integrarla como parte de un gran proyecto de las políticas urbanas o sociales con relación directa al desarrollo urbano y sostenibilidad.

“Hay que ver la vivienda desde el punto de vista multiescalar, porque está relacionada con factores como la calidad de los servicios urbanos, el  agua, el transporte público o incluso el acceso a lugares como parques, plazas públicas, centros comerciales, lugares de trabajo o de esparcimiento”, finalizó.

En 2015, el Centromet publicó el libro Estudios metropolitanos: actualidad y retos (ISBN 978-607-9475-10-9) de los investigadores Isela Orihuela Jurado, Citlalli Becerril Tinoco, Luisa Rodríguez Cortés, Héctor Solano Lamphar y Claudia Tello de la Torre, que es parte de la Colección Contemporánea de la Editorial Mora, disponible en su página de Internet, que fue el primer acercamiento de los investigadores respecto a las problemáticas metropolitanas en México.

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Spotify

Spotify

Autores: Daniel Ek y Martin Lorentzon
Vía Spotify

Web link recomendado por María José Alós, colaboradora de México para Replicación de Arttextum

Spotify es una aplicación multiplataforma empleada para la reproducción de música vía streaming. Cuenta con un modelo de negocio freemium, ofreciendo un servicio gratuito básico y con publicidad; pero con características adicionales, como una mejor calidad de audio, a través de una suscripción de pago. Permite escuchar en «modo radio», buscando por artista, álbum o listas de reproducción creadas por los propios usuarios. El programa se lanzó el 7 de octubre de 2008 al mercado europeo, mientras que su implantación en otros países se realizó a lo largo de 2009.

¿Qué hay en Spotify?

Música

Spotify tiene millones de canciones. Escucha tu música favorita, descubre nuevas canciones y arma tu colección personal.

Playlists

Disfruta de playlists para cada estado de ánimo, armadas por fans y especialistas del mundo de la música.

Nuevos lanzamientos

Escucha los lanzamientos de sencillos y álbumes de la semana, y descubre qué está sonando en el top 50.

Imagen de portada: Gorillaz – Crazy Minds

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Zeitgeist Minds

Zeitgeist Minds

Author: Zeitgeist Minds
Via Zeitgeist Minds

Web link recommended by María José Alós from Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

Google’s Zeitgeist events are a series of intimate gatherings of top global thinkers and leaders. ZeitgeistMinds is a collection of inspiring videos from these events.

Dive in to explore the ideas that affect our social, economic, political and cultural surroundings. Hear perspectives from industry pioneers and statespeople, renowned writers and bloggers, scientists and artists, activists and musicians. Learn from progressive minds, and discuss topics that influence the world around us.

Listen. Join in. Be part of the Zeitgeist.

Imagen de portada: Studio creme

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Celebrating the 117th birthday of the influential filmmaker and visual artist Oskar Fischinger

Celebrating the 117th birthday of the influential filmmaker and visual artist Oskar Fischinger

Creative Lead: Leon Hong
Via Google Doodle | June 22, 2017

Web link recommended by Fernanda Mejía from Colombia/Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

I first discovered Fischinger’s work in a college class on visual music. His films, most of which were made from the 1920s to 1940s, left me awed and puzzled — how could he make such magic without computers?

Film-Flip book, 1970. Courtesy of Angie Fischinger
Film-Flip book, 1970.
Courtesy of Angie Fischinger

In the world of design, Fischinger is a towering figure, especially in the areas of motion graphics and animation. He is best known for his ability to combine impeccably synchronized abstract visuals with musical accompaniment, each frame carefully drawn or photographed by hand. A master of motion and color, Fischinger spent months — sometimes years — planning and handcrafting his animations.

Outward Movement, 1948. Oil on canvas.
Outward Movement, 1948. Favorite painting of Angie Fischinger, Oskars youngest child.
Courtesy of Angie Fischinger

Although mostly known for his films, Fischinger was also a prolific painter, creating numerous works that capture the dramatic movement and feeling of his films within a single frame. Unsatisfied with traditional media, he also invented a contraption, the Lumigraph, for generating fantastic chromatic displays with hand movements — a sort of optical painting in motion and a precursor to the interactive media and multi-touch games of today.
Even with the advanced technology that now exists, emulating Fischinger’s work is an impossible task. His colors and motion are so carefully planned yet naturally playful, his timing so precise yet human. So today’s Doodle aims to pay homage to him, while allowing you to compose your own visual music. I hope it inspires you to seek out the magic of Fischinger for yourself.

— Leon Hong, Creative Lead

Click the image to activate the Doodle
Click the image to activate the Doodle

Special thanks to Angie Fischinger, Oskar’s youngest child, who played an integral role in making this project possible. Below, she shares some thoughts about her father’s work and life:

My parents were German immigrants. They were forced to leave Germany in 1936 when it became clear that my father could not pursue his work as a filmmaker there (avant-garde was considered degenerate by Hitler and his administration). But many people who had already seen his films recognized his greatness. He received an offer to work at MGM and stayed in Hollywood after the war.

My father was incredibly dedicated to his art — some even called him stubborn. His passion and honesty were part of his brilliance, but they could also make him a bit difficult to work with. Sometimes our family struggled financially as a result, so everybody pitched in — the kids got paper routes or did babysitting. We were raised in a healthy, hard-working environment. We were happy, intellectually stimulated, and dedicated to education. Thanks to my family’s support and encouragement, I graduated from San Jose State and taught in the public school system for 30 years.

I feel incredibly proud of my family and am delighted to be the daughter of Oskar and Elfriede Fischinger. It means so much to me to see this celebration of my father’s art. It’s wonderful to know that his work, which has been steadily praised since the 1920s, will continue to receive worldwide recognition.

Production

  • Leon HongCreative Lead
  • Kris HomEngineer
  • Brian MurrayEngineer
  • My-Linh LeProducer & Proj Manager

Doodle Support

  • Perla CamposMarketing & Proj Support
  • Marci WindsheimerBlog Editor

Preset Composers

  • Local Natives
  • Nick Zammuto
  • TOKiMONSTA

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What’s invisible? More than you think – John Lloyd

Author: John Lloyd / TEDTalk
Via http://ed.ted.com | Published on Sep 26, 2012 / TEDTalk from 2009

 

Let’s Begin…

Gravity. The stars in day. Thoughts. The human genome. Time. Atoms. So much of what really matters in the world is impossible to see. A stunning animation of John Lloyd’s classic TEDTalk from 2009, which will make you question what you actually know..
.

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Antonio Vivaldi The Four Seasons. Summer–“STORM”(III part) B&B project (bandura and button accordion)

Antonio Vivaldi The Four Seasons. Summer–“STORM”(III part) B&B project (bandura and button accordion)

Author: B&B project
Via YouTube | April 13, 2016

Video recommended by Andrea López Tyrer from Chile/Spain, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

 

The Four Seasons (Italian: Le quattro stagioni) is a group of four violin concerti by Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi, each of which gives a musical expression to a season of the year. They were written about 1723 and were published in 1725 in Amsterdam, together with eight additional violin concerti, as Il cimento dell’armonia e dell’inventione (“The Contest Between Harmony and Invention”).

The Four Seasons is the best known of Vivaldi’s works. Unusually for the time, Vivaldi published the concerti with accompanying poems (possibly written by Vivaldi himself) that elucidated what it was about those seasons that his music was intended to evoke. It provides one of the earliest and most-detailed examples of what was later called program music—music with a narrative element.

Vivaldi took great pains to relate his music to the texts of the poems, translating the poetic lines themselves directly into the music on the page. In the middle section of the Spring concerto, where the goatherd sleeps, his barking dog can be marked in the viola section. Other natural occurrences are similarly evoked. Vivaldi separated each concerto into three movements, fast-slow-fast, and likewise each linked sonnet into three sections.

B&B project – Ukrainian musicians who popularizing national instruments – bayan and bandura. On YouTube this music group gathered about 3 million views. Experiments with music, modern style, quality performance it is the basic direction of the musicians.

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SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe: Modern Ruins 1:220

Iván Puig, artista Arttextum

Author: The Arts Catalyst
Via SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe: Modern Ruins 1:220 | June 21, 2014

 

Artists Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene (Los Ferronautas) built their striking silver road-rail SEFT-1 vehicle to explore the abandoned passenger railways of Mexico and Ecuador, capturing their journeys in videos, photographs and collected objects.

In their first London exhibition, SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe: Modern Ruins 1: 200, commissioned by The Arts Catalyst and presented in partnership with Furtherfield Gallery, in the heart of Finsbury Park, the artists explore how the ideology of progress is imprinted onto historic landscapes and reflect on the two poles of the social experience of technology – use and obsolescence.

Between 2010 and 2011, the artists travelled across Mexico and Ecuador in the SEFT-1 (Sonda de Exploración Ferroviaria Tripulada or Manned Railway Exploration Probe). In a transdisciplinary art project, they set out to explore disused railways as a starting point for reflection and research, recording the landscapes and infrastructure around and between cities. Interviewing people they met, often from communities isolated by Mexico’s passenger railway closures, they shared their findings online, seft1.com, where audiences could track the probe’s trajectory, view maps and images and listen to interviews.

The artists’ journeys led them to the notion of modern ruins: places and systems left behind quite recently, not because they weren’t functional, but for a range of political and economical reasons. In the second half of the 19th century, the Mexican government partnered with British companies to built the railway line that would connect Mexico City with the Atlantic Ocean – and beyond to Europe. This iconic railway infrastructure now lies in ruins, much of it abandoned due to the privatization of the railway system in 1995, when many passenger trains were withdrawn, lines cut off and communities isolated.

For this new exhibition, the artists are inviting British expert model railway constructors to collaborate by creating scale reproductions of specific Mexican railway ruins exactly as they are now. One gallery becomes a space for the process of model ruin construction. The room’s walls will show the pictures, documents, plans and other materials used as reference for the meticulously elaborated ruin construction. With this action a dystopian time tunnel is created.

The exhibition was held at the Furtherfield Gallery, Finsbury Park, London N4 2NQ, UK, 21 June to 27 July 2014.

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Iván Puig, artista Arttextum
Iván Puig