Hayao Miyazaki: What You Can Imagine

By: JD Thompson
Via YouTube | September 4, 2016

This is a brief analysis of animator filmmaker, Hayao Miyazaki.

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Iván Puig, artista Arttextum
Iván Puig
Joana Moll, artista Arttextum
Joana Moll
Georgina Santos, artista Arttextum
Georgina Santos

Celebrating the 117th birthday of the influential filmmaker and visual artist Oskar Fischinger

Celebrating the 117th birthday of the influential filmmaker and visual artist Oskar Fischinger

Creative Lead: Leon Hong
Via Google Doodle | June 22, 2017

Web link recommended by Fernanda Mejía from Colombia/Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

I first discovered Fischinger’s work in a college class on visual music. His films, most of which were made from the 1920s to 1940s, left me awed and puzzled — how could he make such magic without computers?

Film-Flip book, 1970. Courtesy of Angie Fischinger
Film-Flip book, 1970.
Courtesy of Angie Fischinger

In the world of design, Fischinger is a towering figure, especially in the areas of motion graphics and animation. He is best known for his ability to combine impeccably synchronized abstract visuals with musical accompaniment, each frame carefully drawn or photographed by hand. A master of motion and color, Fischinger spent months — sometimes years — planning and handcrafting his animations.

Outward Movement, 1948. Oil on canvas.
Outward Movement, 1948. Favorite painting of Angie Fischinger, Oskars youngest child.
Courtesy of Angie Fischinger

Although mostly known for his films, Fischinger was also a prolific painter, creating numerous works that capture the dramatic movement and feeling of his films within a single frame. Unsatisfied with traditional media, he also invented a contraption, the Lumigraph, for generating fantastic chromatic displays with hand movements — a sort of optical painting in motion and a precursor to the interactive media and multi-touch games of today.
Even with the advanced technology that now exists, emulating Fischinger’s work is an impossible task. His colors and motion are so carefully planned yet naturally playful, his timing so precise yet human. So today’s Doodle aims to pay homage to him, while allowing you to compose your own visual music. I hope it inspires you to seek out the magic of Fischinger for yourself.

— Leon Hong, Creative Lead

Click the image to activate the Doodle
Click the image to activate the Doodle

Special thanks to Angie Fischinger, Oskar’s youngest child, who played an integral role in making this project possible. Below, she shares some thoughts about her father’s work and life:

My parents were German immigrants. They were forced to leave Germany in 1936 when it became clear that my father could not pursue his work as a filmmaker there (avant-garde was considered degenerate by Hitler and his administration). But many people who had already seen his films recognized his greatness. He received an offer to work at MGM and stayed in Hollywood after the war.

My father was incredibly dedicated to his art — some even called him stubborn. His passion and honesty were part of his brilliance, but they could also make him a bit difficult to work with. Sometimes our family struggled financially as a result, so everybody pitched in — the kids got paper routes or did babysitting. We were raised in a healthy, hard-working environment. We were happy, intellectually stimulated, and dedicated to education. Thanks to my family’s support and encouragement, I graduated from San Jose State and taught in the public school system for 30 years.

I feel incredibly proud of my family and am delighted to be the daughter of Oskar and Elfriede Fischinger. It means so much to me to see this celebration of my father’s art. It’s wonderful to know that his work, which has been steadily praised since the 1920s, will continue to receive worldwide recognition.

Production

  • Leon HongCreative Lead
  • Kris HomEngineer
  • Brian MurrayEngineer
  • My-Linh LeProducer & Proj Manager

Doodle Support

  • Perla CamposMarketing & Proj Support
  • Marci WindsheimerBlog Editor

Preset Composers

  • Local Natives
  • Nick Zammuto
  • TOKiMONSTA

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Joana Moll, artista Arttextum
Joana Moll
Iván Puig, artista Arttextum
Iván Puig
Demian Schopf, artista Arttextum
Demian Schopf

Shhhh, We’ve Got a Secret: Soil Solves Global Warming

Shhhh, We’ve Got a Secret: Soil Solves Global Warming

Author: George Spyros
Via Tree Hugger | June 28, 2007

Article recommended by Mick Lorusso from the USA / Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

 

In the seven-minute video after the jump, QuantumShift.tv turns its lens to the carbon emissions caused by large-scale farming practices used in growing much of the food in the United States, Canada and the UK. According to the video Soil: The Secret Solution to Global Warming, land farmed organically, using such methods as “no-till” and the planting of winter cover crops, absorbs and holds up to 30% more carbon than conventional agriculture. Converting all US farmland to organic would reduce CO2 emissions by 10%. The UK version of the video states that such a conversion would result in a 20% per year reduction in CO2 emissions (although the on-screen graphic still reads 10%, ostensibly because only the voice-over has been changed from the US version). The extra carbon in the soil also increases food nutrients, which could greatly reduce health care costs. Dig a little deeper after the jump.

The land-based carbon cycle works as plants take CO2 out of the atmosphere and convert it to organic material by photosynthesis. The oxygen in the molecule is released back into the air and the carbon becomes part of the plant’s structure and eventually the soil. Plowing churns up this organic matter and introduces oxygen which expedites its decay. That is, the exposed carbon recombines with oxygen and is released into the atmosphere as CO2, a principle greenhouse gas. The organic farming practice of no-till greatly reduces this large-scale break-up of soil by cutting small slits that are just large enough to accommodate the planting of seeds, thereby conserving the amount of carbon stored in the earth. From a policy perspective, it is most accurate and I think effective to refer to such storing as “agricultural carbon sequestration” in opposition to the industrial catch phrase “carbon sequestration” which refers to the business of going to impractical lengths and assuming a high degree of risk to bury CO2 in the earth’s crust. According to the USDA, U.S. agricultural soils have lost, on average, about one-third of the carbon they contained before wide-scale cultivation began in the 1800s, but more on that later. The video also points out that less tillage also decreases C02 emissions from farm machinery since the equipment makes fewer runs over the field. Also, the benefits of no-till sequestration are tripled when combined with the planting of winter cover crops which are used in organic farming to maintain a healthy soil.

Much of the data in the video is based on a 27-year comparative study conducted by the Rodale Institute in Pennsylvannia which also dispels the myth that chemical fertilizers are needed to provide better yields. Today I spoke briefly with Dr. Paul Hepperly who’s featured in the video in an on-camera interview, and he told me that the data from the study has been taken up by Kyoto Protocol signatories Great Britain, Germany and the Netherlands as a component of their climate roadmaps for reducing atmospheric CO2 levels. Notwithstanding that good news, petitions are available which have the goal of pushing leaders to shift existing agricultural subsidies from conventional to organic farming. Go here to sign for the US, Canada or ROW (rest of world).

Image: YouTube

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Gilberto Esparza, artista Arttextum
Gilberto Esparza
Mick Lorusso, artista Arttextum
Mick Lorusso
Joana Moll, artista Arttextum
Joana Moll

Every Noise at Once

Author: Glenn McDonald – The Echo Nest
Via Every Noise at Once

 

Sound, maps & algorithms!

This is an ongoing attempt at an algorithmically-generated, readability-adjusted scatter-plot of the musical genre-space, based on data tracked and analyzed for 1387 genres by The Echo Nest. The calibration is fuzzy, but in general down is more organic, up is more mechanical and electric; left is denser and more atmospheric, right is spikier and bouncier.

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttetum artists:

Joana Moll, artista Arttextum
Joana Moll
Taniel Morales, artista Arttextum
Taniel Morales
Leonel Vásquez, artista Arttextum
Leonel Vásquez

Experimento comprueba que la realidad no existe hasta que es observada

Autor: Alejandro Martínez Gallardo
Vía PijamaSurf | Mayo 6, 2015

 

Experimento cuántico muestra que la realidad emerge a través del acto de medición; extrapolar esto pone en entredicho la naturaleza de la realidad en la que creemos movernos y sugiere que la conciencia afecta la materia

Una de las interrogantes más extrañas y fascinantes que genera la física cuántica es la posibilidad de que el mundo que experimentamos esté siendo generado por nuestra percepción del mismo. En términos científicos, que los fenómenos se manifiesten de tal o cual forma según el acto de medición. Y hasta que no son medidos, hasta que la mirada del instrumento no se posa sobre ellos, permanecen en un estado de indefinición que desafía toda lógica: son y no son, están vivos y muertos, son ondas y partículas. O, de otra forma, no existen o son todo a la vez. La potencia infinita del vacío.

Hace unos días, un grupo de científicos australianos publicó los resultados de un experimento que confirma esta noción tan allegada a la física cuántica, probando de alguna manera que la realidad no existe hasta que la medimos, al menos no la realidad en una escala cuántica, que, aunque minúscula, es lo que constituye todas las cosas del universo. El experimento es una recreación de otro experimento propuesto por el recientemente fallecido John Wheeler, el físico que desarrolló la teoría de un universo participante en el que el sujeto no está separado del objeto. Wheeler había sugerido en su experimento de la “decisión dilatada” de una onda-partícula que solo cuando medimos los átomos sus propiedades emergen a la realidad.

Según el comunicado de prensa, los científicos australianos primero lograron atrapar un solo átomo de helio en un estado de condensación Bose-Einstein. Luego se dejó pasar este átomo a través de un par de rayos láser, lo cual creó un patrón de rejilla que actuó como una encrucijada para dispersar la trayectoria del átomo, de la misma forma que una rejilla sólida dispersa la luz. Enseguida, se añadió otra rejilla de luz de forma aleatoria para recombinar los caminos, creando una interferencia, como si el átomo hubiera optado por ambos caminos. Sin esta segunda rejilla, el átomo se comportaba como si solo hubiera elegido un solo camino. Sin embargo, el número aleatorio que determinaba si se añadía la rejilla era generado después de que el átomo pasaba por la encrucijada. Esto sugiere que la medición futura estaba afectando la decisión en el pasado del átomo. Según el doctor Andrew Truscott: “Los átomos no viajaron de A a B. Fue solo cuando se midieron al final del viaje que existió el comportamiento ondulatorio o de partícula”.

Esta es una prueba más del quantum weirdness o la extraña naturaleza de la realidad que, si ponemos atención, merece que cuestionemos muchas de nuestras creencias sobre cómo funciona el universo. Explicar por qué sucede esto es sumamente complejo y por el momento altamente especulativo. Sin embargo, una de las explicaciones que más tracción tiene es la posibilidad de que la conciencia sea una propiedad constitutiva del universo. Si la conciencia también existe a nivel cuántico este tipo de comportamientos podría explicarse como el efecto de mente sobre materia.

la-realidad-no-existe-arttextum

Analizando un experimento previo cuya intención fue demostrar el mismo fenómeno el doctor Dean Radin, del Noetic Institute, escribió:

La medición cuántica es un problema ya que viola la doctrina comúnmente aceptada del realismo, que asume que el mundo en general es independiente de la observación. El conflicto entre el realismo ingenuo y lo que implica el problema de medición cuántica obligó a muchos de los pioneros de la teoría cuántica a considerar el significado de observación y medición. Algunos como Pauli, Jordan y Wigner creyeron que algún aspecto de la conciencia –refiriéndose a capacidades mentales como la atención, la alerta y la intención– era indispensable para entender la medición cuántica. Jordan escribió: “Las observaciones no solo perturban lo medido, lo producen… Provocamos que el electrón asuma cierta posición definida. Nosotros mismos producimos el resultado de la medición”.

Pese a que existen muchos indicios de que la conciencia debería de entrar en la ecuación, en nuestro modelo de qué es la naturaleza no solamente como un epifenómeno o un fantasma cerebral producido aleatoriamente por la evolución, no vemos que se hagan muchos experimentos con esto en mente. Esta posibilidad, aunque es contemplada filosóficamente por algunos de los científicos más brillantes, no logra romper el huevo paradigmático y aventurarse al proceso de comprobación científica. Dean Radin concluye que:

La noción de que la conciencia puede estar relacionada a la formación de la realidad física ha sido asociada más con la magia medieval y las ideas new age que con la ciencia sobria. Como resultado, es más seguro para la carrera de un científico evitar relacionarse con temas tan dudosos y subsecuentemente los experimentos que examinan  estas ideas son difíciles de encontrar en la física. De hecho el tabú es tan grande que hasta hace poco se había extendido a todo examen sobre los fundamentos de la teoría cuántica. Por más de 50 años estos experimentos se han considerado inapropiados para un investigador serio.

Imágenes: PijamaSurf y Erminauta

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Mick Lorusso, artista Arttextum
Mick Lorusso
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Joana Moll, artista Arttextum
Joana Moll

El impacto medioambiental de Google

Joana Moll, artista Arttextum

Autores: Roberta Bosco y Stefano Caldana
Vía Fundación Aquae | Octubre 6, 2015

 

Sin tomar en consideración la actividad de las industrias, está comprobado que el tráfico aéreo genera menos contaminación que los tradicionales medios de transporte, pero ¿puede ser superado por las emisiones generadas por la actividad de los usuarios de la red?

La asombrosa respuesta es sí. Lo demuestra la artista catalana Joana Moll (Barcelona, 1982) con su CO2GLE, un proyecto artístico que revela un dato sorprendente: navegar en la red contamina más que volar con un avión. De hecho, sólo la lectura de este artículo supone una emisión en la atmósfera de aproximadamente 0.17 gramos de dióxido de carbono (CO2).

Toda actividad humana implica un coste para el medioambiente, que se puede plasmar en porcentajes de emisiones de gases contaminantes en la atmósfera y entre todos ellos, el dióxido de carbono es uno de los más nefastos para el clima mundial y uno de los principales responsables del efecto invernadero. Todavía no se ha llegado a entender exactamente la repercusión de la actividad de los internautas para el medioambiente, aunque según estudios recientes Internet es responsable del 2 % de las emisiones globales de CO2. En promedio la producción de 1 Kwh. de energía emite 544 gr. de CO2 y son necesarios 13 Kwh. para transmitir 1GB de información, lo que equivale a 7,07 Kg. de CO2.

Evidentemente todos estos datos son aproximativos y afortunadamente este espacio de la Fundación Aquae sigue manteniéndose en unos márgenes de contaminación aceptables si los comparamos con el efecto diario generado por las emisiones de sitios muy populares como Facebook, YouTube o Google. Este último es el sitio más visitado de Internet con un promedio aproximado de 47.000 solicitudes cada segundo. Considerando que su web pesa cerca de 2 MB, se puede afirmar que a raíz de su uso la atmósfera recibe una cantidad que se acerca a los 500 Kg. de CO2 por segundo.

Todo esto se desprende de CO2GLE, un nuevo proyecto para Internet de la artista, docente e investigadora Joana Moll, que se expondrá a partir de mañana en The Promise Of The Internet, una exposición organizada por Connect The Dots. La obra de Joana Moll, que se proyectará en distintos espacios del vanguardista centro de arte de Sheffield (Reino Unido), es una despiadada y cruda página web que, gracias al empleo de un algoritmo, evoluciona inexorablemente relatando a través de los números la irremediable realidad sobre la cantidad de dióxido de carbono que Google lanza en la atmósfera. “CO2GLE se sitúa en una zona ambigua entre arte e investigación. Es una performance virtual simbólica, que intenta crear un espacio para la reflexión y el pensamiento crítico en relación a las consecuencias materiales de la híper-aceleración del infospace”, explica Moll, una creadora transdisciplinaria que trabaja en la investigación creativa sobre el uso de las nuevas tecnologías y su repercusión en la sociedad contemporánea.

La artista nos explicó como la idea de CO2GLE surgió después de varios años investigando los métodos de videovigilancia civil en la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México para Arizona: move and get shot, su anterior trabajo. “Me dediqué a estudiar cómo ciudadanos civiles controlan la frontera desde sus casas a través de cámaras web y plataformas online, que les permiten denunciar a las autoridades la entrada de inmigración ilegal en territorio estadounidense. Durante esa exploración me preocupó mucho la desconexión entre la acción y la consecuencia al operar por el medio digital, sobretodo la dilución de las responsabilidades de la acción y sus implicaciones éticas, políticas, económicas y medioambientales”, indica Moll relatando como a través de esa inquietud, a finales de 2013 empezó a preguntarse acerca del impacto material del uso de Internet.

“En realidad no tenía muy claro por dónde empezar y comencé a investigar la cantidad de kilovatio-hora (Kwh.) que se necesita para cargar la información en la red. Obviamente este proceso se traduce en emisiones de dióxido de carbono (CO2), y me pregunté cómo es posible que una conexión tan obvia estuviera tan desdibujada en la imaginación social. Calcular las emisiones exactas generadas por las comunicaciones en la red es extremadamente difícil debido a la gran cantidad de actores participantes en el proceso, entonces CO2GLE nació con la idea de hacer visible la materialidad de lo virtual y resaltar esa conexión”, concluye Moll que actualmente está desarrollando un plugin para navegadores, que permitirá calcular en tiempo real las emisiones aproximadas que un usuario genera al navegar por la red.

Sin embargo su investigación no concluye allí y sin ahondar mucho en la repercusión ecológica generada por las principales industrias, la artista ha querido compartir con nosotros también unas estadísticas sobre la contaminación de los pequeños objetos domésticos y las acciones cotidianas, que a pesar de llevar tiempo circulando por la red parecen no haber generado mucha sorpresa en la opinión pública. Sin embargo hay datos asombrosos, por ejemplo planchar una camiseta produce una emisión de 25 gr. y un minuto de llamada por el móvil puede alcanzar los 57 gr. En cambio se calcula que un tweet genera aproximadamente 0.2 gr. de CO2, mucho menos que los 4 gr. que requiere enviar un email o los 12 gr. necesarios para mantener encendido un ordenador portátil durante una hora.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Más sobre la artista de Arttextum:

Joana Moll, artista Arttextum
Joana Moll