El científico más innovador del que jamás oíste hablar

Autor: TED-Ed
Vía YouTube | Octubre 1, 2013

El geólogo danés del siglo XVII, Nicolás Sténon, se ganó la vida a temprana edad, estudiando cadáveres y estableciendo conexiones anatómicas entre las especies.

arttextum-replicacion-innovador.png

Sténon hizo aportes descomunales en el campo de la geología, influyendo en Charles Lyell, James Hutton y Charles Darwin. Addison Anderson relata el legado poco conocido de Sténon y alaba su insistencia en el empirismo sobre la teoría ciega.

Lección de Addison Anderson, animación de Anton Bogaty.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Gilberto Esparza, artista Arttextum
Gilberto Esparza
Iván Puig, artista Arttextum
Iván Puig
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas

John Wheeler’s Participatory Universe

Autor: Marina Jones
Vía futurism | February 13, 2014

Besides his extraordinary contributions to the field of theoretical physics, Wheeler inspired many aspiring young scientists, including some of the greats of the 20th century. Among his doctoral students were Richard Feynman, a Nobel Prize laureate, with whom he coauthored the “Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory”; Hugh Everett, who proposed the many worlds interpretation; Kip Thorne, who predicted the existence of red supergiant stars with neutron-star cores; Jacob Bekenstein, who formulated black hole thermodynamics; Charles Misner, who discovered a mathematical spacetime called Misner space; Arthur Wightman, the originator of Wightman axioms; and Benjamin Schumacher, who invented the term “qubit” and is known for the “Schumacher compression”. The list could go on.

Wheeler had a reputation pushing his students into a place where logical thought would not necessarily take them. Former student Richard Feynman, to Kip Thorne, declared, “Some people think that Wheeler’s gotten crazy in his later years, but he’s always been crazy![Reference: Princeton] Wheeler was willing to make a fool of himself, to go anywhere, talk to anybody, and ask any question that would get him closer to understanding “how things are put together.” 

LEGACY:

Wheeler believed that the real reason universities have students is to educate the professors. But to be educated by the students, a professor had to ask good questions. “You try out your questions on the students”, he wrote, “If there are questions that the students get interested in, then they start to tell you new things and keep you asking more new questions. Pretty soon you have learned a great deal.” [Reference: Cosmic Search Vol. 1 No. 4]

Wheeler had a fantastic sense of humor. Often he engaged in Koan-like expressions that puzzled and amused his listeners. He saw beauty in strangeness and actively sought it out. He declared, “If you haven’t found something strange during the day, it hasn’t been much of a day.”

Wheeler divided his own life into three parts. The first part he called “Everything is Particles.” The second part was “Everything is Fields.” And the third part, which Wheeler considered the bedrock of his physical theory, he called “Everything is Information.”

EVERYTHING IS PARTICLES:

John Archilald Wheeler was born on July 9, 1911, in Jacksonville, Florida, into a family of librarians. At 16, he won a scholarship to Johns Hopkins University. He graduated five years later with a Ph.D in physics. A year later he got engaged to Janette Hegner. They stayed married for 72 years.

Source UnknownIn 1933 in an application for the National Research Council Fellowship to go to Copenhagen and work with Neils Bohr, Wheeler wrote: “I want to go to work with Neils Bohr because he sees further than any man alive.” Bohr and Wheeler published their first paper in the late 1930s, explaining nuclear fission in terms of quantum physics. They argued that the atomic nucleus, containing protons and neutrons, is like a drop of liquid, which starts vibrating and elongating into a peanut shape when a neutron emitted from another disintegrating nucleus collides with it. As a result, the peanut shaped atomic nucleus snaps into two.

In 1938 Wheeler started teaching at Princeton University. In 1941 he interrupted his academic work to join the Manhattan Project team (which included the likes of Feynman, Bohr and Albert Einstein – with Marie Curie helping lay out the blueprints) in building an atomic bomb. Wheeler considered it his duty to help with the war effort, but the atomic bomb wasn’t ready in time to end the war and save his beloved brother, who died in Italy in 1944.

After the war ended, Wheeler returned to Princeton and taught Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which at a time was not considered a “respectable” field of physics. Wheeler’s classes were exciting – one of his tricks was to write on chalkboards with both hands. He frequently took his students to Albert Einstein’s house in Princeton for discussions over a cup of tea.

EVERYTHING IS FIELDS:

Wheeler co-wrote the most influential textbook on general relativity with Charles W. Misner and Kip Thorne. It was called Gravitation. While working on mathematical extensions to the theory, Wheeler described hypothetical “tunnels” in space-time which he called “wormholes”. He was not the first scientist to think of the possibility of wormholes, or even black holes, but he established the idea. In this regard, it’s worth noting that Democritus, an ancient Greek philosopher, suggested that matter was composed of atoms, which was “mainstreamed” by John Dalton’s discovery of atoms 2000 years later. In 1784, John Mitchell, a Yorkshire clergyman, suggested that light was subject to the force of gravity long before Einstein proved it.

After the publication of the theory of General Relativity in 1916, in which Albert Einstein predicted the existence of black holes, in 1967 John Wheeler named them. Nigel Calder calls them “awesome engines of quasars and active galaxies.” We now have multiple variations of the original concept: charged black holes, rotating black holes, stationary black holes, supermassive black holes, stellar black holes, miniature black holes.

EVERYTHING IS INFORMATION:

Let’s get to Wheeler’s three-part life- story, the last part he called “Everything is Information”.

In the final decades of his life, the question that intrigued Wheeler most was: “Are life and mind irrelevant to the structure of the universe, or are they central to it?” He suggested that the nature of reality was revealed by the bizarre laws of quantum mechanics. According to the quantum theory, before the observation is made, a subatomic particle exists in several states, called a superposition (or, as Wheeler called it, a ‘smoky dragon’). Once the particle is observed, it instantaneously collapses into a single position.

Wheeler suggested that reality is created by observers and that: “no phenomenon is a real phenomenon until it is an observed phenomenon.” He coined the termParticipatory Anthropic Principle (PAP) from the Greek “anthropos”, or human. He went further to suggest that “we are participants in bringing into being not only the near and here, but the far away and long ago.” [Reference: Radio Interview With Martin Redfern]

This claim was considered rather outlandish until his thought experiment, known as the “delayed-choice experiment,” was tested in a laboratory in 1984. This experiment was a variation on the famous “double-slit experiment” in which the dual nature of light was exposed (depending on how the experiment was measured and observed, the light behaved like a particle (a photon) or like a wave).

Unlike the original “double-slit experiment”, in Wheeler’s version, the method of detection was changed AFTER a photon had passed the double slit. The experiment showed that the path of the photon was not fixed until the physicists made their measurements. The results of this experiment, as well as another conducted in 2007, proved what Wheeler had always suspected – observers’ consciousness is required to bring the universe into existence. This means that a pre-life Earth would have existed in an undetermined state, and a pre-life universe could only exist retroactively.

A UNIVERSE ‘FINE-TUNED’ FOR LIFE:

These conclusions lead many scientists to speculate that the universe is fine-tuned for life. This is how Wheeler’s Princeton colleague, Robert Dicke, explained the existence of our universe:

“If you want an observer around, and if you want life, you need heavy elements. To make heavy elements out of hydrogen, you need thermonuclear combustion. To have thermonuclear combustion, you need a time of cooking in a star of several billion years. In order to stretch out several billion years in its time dimension, the universe, according to general relativity, must be several years across in its space dimensions. So why is the universe as big as it is? Because we are here!”

[Reference: Cosmic Search Vol. 1 No. 4]

Stephen Hawking has also noted: “The laws of science, as we know them at present, seem to have been very finely adjusted to make possible the development of life.” Fred Hoyle, in his book Intelligent Universe, compares “the chance of obtaining even a single functioning protein by a chance combination of amino acids to a star system full of blind men solving Rubik’s Cube simultaneously.”

Physicist Andrei Linde of Stanford University adds: “The universe and the observer exist as a pair. I cannot imagine a consistent theory of the universe that ignores consciousness.” [Reference: “Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the Universe“]

Wheeler, always an optimist, believed that one day we would have a clear understanding of the origin of the universe. He had “a sense of faith that it can be done.” “Faith”, he wrote, “is the number one element. It isn’t something that spreads itself uniformly. Faith is concentrated in few people at particular times and places. If you can involve young people in an atmosphere of hope and faith, then I think they’ll figure out how to get the answer.”

CONCLUSION:

Wheeler died of pneumonia on April 13, 2008, at age 96. His whole life he searched for answers to philosophical questions about the origin of matter, the nature of information and the universe. “We are no longer satisfied with insights into particles, or fields of force, or geometry, or even space and time,” he wrote in 1981, “Today we demand of physics some understanding of existence itself.”  [Reference: “The Voice of Genius: Conversations with Nobel Scientists and Other Luminaries”]

Let’s hope that young scientists will continue to be encouraged by these words and will push the boundaries of human imagination beyond its limits, and maybe even find the elusive final theory – a Theory of Everything.

John Archibald Wheeler (1911-2008) was a scientist-philosopher who introduced the concept of wormholes and coined the term “black hole”. He pioneered the theory of nuclear fission with Niels Bohr and introduced the S-matrix (the scattering matrix used in quantum mechanics). Wheeler devised a concept of quantum foam; a theory of “virtual particles” popping in and out of existence in space (similarly, he conceptualized foam as the foundation of the fabric of the universe).

Imagen destacada: How It Works

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Artists de Arttextum relacionados:

Edith Medina, artista Arttextum
Edith Medina
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Iván Puig, artista Arttextum
Iván Puig

El índice de sostenibilidad ambiental “Hecho en México”

Autor: Conacyt, Israel Pérez Valencia
Vía Conacytprensa | Agosto 22, 2017

Ante las diferentes problemáticas que enfrentan las ciudades y metrópolis por el crecimiento urbano, investigadores del Centro Interdisciplinario de Estudios Metropolitanos (Centromet) alistan un índice de sostenibilidad ambiental que busca abordar estos problemas en el marco de un contexto mexicano.

Los investigadores del Centromet a cargo de esta iniciativa son Citlalli Aideé Becerril Tinoco, Karol Yáñez Soria, Héctor Antonio Solano Lamphar y Fabricio Espinosa Ortiz, y abordarán temáticas como cambio climático, biodiversidad, contaminantes atmosféricos, residuos sólidos y peligrosos, así como legislación ambiental.

Al respecto, el profesor investigador Héctor Antonio Solano Lamphar informó que este proyecto de estudio del Centromet pretende abordar las temáticas más importantes de la sostenibilidad ambiental, en un primera etapa, a nivel teórico y presentar los resultados de este índice en un artículo y después en un libro.

“Buscamos que este índice de sostenibilidad ambiental sea distinto al que maneja la Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) y otros organismos gubernamentales, principalmente porque estamos abordando factores importantes, recopilación de datos y metodologías diseñadas en el contexto nacional, es decir, que no necesitan ser adecuadas a las realidades urbanas y heterogéneas de nuestro país”, aseguró.

Solano Lamphar destacó que en este primer acercamiento están colaborando cuatro investigadores especialistas del Centromet, con lo que se pretende establecer una discusión sobre las condiciones del país respecto a la sostenibilidad, que es un término que ha estado de moda pero que no suele usarse adecuadamente.

1 centyromet2208“En este primer acercamiento buscamos una discusión sobre el concepto, así como una incorporación de variables que nosotros consideramos las más coherentes para incorporarlas en un índice de sostenibilidad ambiental, como cambio climático, biodiversidad, contaminantes atmosféricos, residuos sólidos y peligrosos, así como legislación ambiental”, indicó.

Ciudades compactas y difusas

El investigador del Centromet puntualizó que la siguiente etapa de este índice de sostenibilidad ambiental es llevarlo a casos específicos, empezando por Querétaro y el Bajío, donde no solo se hagan los estudios sino que además se propongan soluciones e información accesible que sea de utilidad para tomadores de decisiones,  servidores públicos y ciudadanos en general.

“En lo que se refiere a la contaminación, que es mi área, se busca hacer una distinción entre las ciudades compactas y difusas, además del cómo contamina cada una de ellas. Por ejemplo, en Europa se tienen ciudades más compactas donde las personas viven en edificios, es decir, construyen hacia arriba, y donde se observa que son más controlables en lo que se refiere a vías de comunicación, son ciudades grandes pero pequeñas en extensión; sin embargo, dependiendo de los materiales con que se construyeron, la orografía y montañas que las rodean, se pueden concentrar más los aerosoles artificiales y naturales”, advirtió.

En el caso de las ciudades difusas, la mancha territorial se dispersa hacia los alrededores, hay ciudades dentro de las ciudades y, además de la contaminación, tienen problemáticas en lo que se refiere al acceso a los servicios o la calidad de las viviendas.

El agua en México

Por su parte, la investigadora del Centromet Citlalli Aideé Becerril Tinoco estudia el manejo y servicio de las aguas potables y tratadas en los niveles comunitario, ciudades y metrópolis.

“Tenemos casi tres años trabajando en el proyecto. El tema del agua es muy sensible a nivel nacional porque hay ciudades que están teniendo un crecimiento de manera exponencial en todos los sentidos. Por ejemplo, Querétaro se está expandiendo de manera muy acelerada, se han otorgado demasiadas concesiones a constructoras del mercado inmobiliario. Con ello no solo se expande la mancha urbana sino que la dotación de servicios es un reto, tomando en cuenta que se tiene que garantizar el agua potable al total de estas poblaciones”, sostuvo.

Becerril Tinoco detalló que ya cuenta con un diagnóstico a nivel nacional, que será el punto de partida para las líneas de investigación del índice de sostenibilidad ambiental.

1 centeo2208“Las líneas se enfocan en estudiar la disponibilidad de agua en lo general, el agua potable, la escasez hídrica y su relación con el crecimiento poblacional, estrés hídrico y vulnerabilidad de las ciudades por la falta de agua, ya sea por procesos naturales, como sequías, fallas en las redes, o por decisiones de autoridades tanto en zonas urbanas como en metrópolis. La falta de agua ya es un problema latente en todo el país, principalmente por el crecimiento desordenado en las ciudades”, subrayó.

Sostenibilidad urbana en México

En ese sentido, la investigadora del Centromet Karol Yáñez Soria desarrolla líneas de investigación dirigidas a hacer un análisis crítico y propuestas para la medición de la sostenibilidad urbana en México.

“Trabajé un proyecto en la Organización de las Naciones Unidas con un índice que mide la prosperidad urbana y la sostenibilidad ambiental, para identificar en el territorio las temáticas y poder aportar estrategias en tópicos como el agua, la generación y reciclaje de basura, sostenibilidad ambiental y gobernanza, ante los crecimientos no planeados de las ciudades que ha generado problemáticas como la urbanización en ecosistemas donde se lleva a cabo la captura de agua de los acuíferos”, advirtió.

La calidad de la vivienda

La siguiente línea de estudio propuesta para el índice de sostenibilidad ambiental del Centromet la desarrolla el investigador Fabricio Espinosa Ortiz, quien analiza las problemáticas de la vivienda en México, así como su relación con la calidad de vida de las personas en las ciudades y metrópolis.

“Existe una serie de variables en un estudio de este tipo, como son la valorización de la vivienda por parte de las personas, la adaptación de los espacios públicos, las características de la movilidad urbana en temas muy sensibles como lo es el transporte público y las diferentes estrategias que deben de seguirse para mejorarlos”, enumeró.

Espinosa Ortiz informó que el objetivo es entender la vivienda desde una perspectiva más allá de una simple unidad habitacional, observar cómo se relaciona con las aspiraciones y deseos de sus habitantes, así como integrarla como parte de un gran proyecto de las políticas urbanas o sociales con relación directa al desarrollo urbano y sostenibilidad.

“Hay que ver la vivienda desde el punto de vista multiescalar, porque está relacionada con factores como la calidad de los servicios urbanos, el  agua, el transporte público o incluso el acceso a lugares como parques, plazas públicas, centros comerciales, lugares de trabajo o de esparcimiento”, finalizó.

En 2015, el Centromet publicó el libro Estudios metropolitanos: actualidad y retos (ISBN 978-607-9475-10-9) de los investigadores Isela Orihuela Jurado, Citlalli Becerril Tinoco, Luisa Rodríguez Cortés, Héctor Solano Lamphar y Claudia Tello de la Torre, que es parte de la Colección Contemporánea de la Editorial Mora, disponible en su página de Internet, que fue el primer acercamiento de los investigadores respecto a las problemáticas metropolitanas en México.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artists de Arttextum relacionados:

Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Gilberto Esparza, artista Arttextum
Gilberto Esparza
Iván Puig, artista Arttextum
Iván Puig

Zeitgeist Minds

Zeitgeist Minds

Author: Zeitgeist Minds
Via Zeitgeist Minds

Web link recommended by María José Alós from Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

Google’s Zeitgeist events are a series of intimate gatherings of top global thinkers and leaders. ZeitgeistMinds is a collection of inspiring videos from these events.

Dive in to explore the ideas that affect our social, economic, political and cultural surroundings. Hear perspectives from industry pioneers and statespeople, renowned writers and bloggers, scientists and artists, activists and musicians. Learn from progressive minds, and discuss topics that influence the world around us.

Listen. Join in. Be part of the Zeitgeist.

Imagen de portada: Studio creme

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Iván Puig, artista Arttextum
Iván Puig
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Gilda Mantilla & Raimond Chaves, artistas Arttextum
Gilda Mantilla & Raimond Chaves

Start with why — how great leaders inspire action | Simon Sinek | TEDxPugetSound

Autor: Simon Sinek
Vía YouTube | Publicado en Septiembre 28, 2009

 

TEDx Puget Sound speaker – Simon Sinek – Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Action

About TEDx, x=independently organize event
In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-
organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience.
At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep
discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized
events are branded TEDx, where x=independently organized TED event.
The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but
individual TEDx events are self-organized.*
(*Subject to certain rules and regulations).

.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Gilda Mantilla & Raimond Chaves, artistas Arttextum
Gilda Mantilla & Raimond Chaves
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Georgina Santos, artista Arttextum
Georgina Santos

The Map of Physics

Author: Domain of Science
Via YouTube | November 27, 2016

Everything we know about physics – and a few things we don’t – in a simple map.

If you are interested in buying a print you can buy it as a poster here: http://www.redbubble.com/people/domin…

Or on a load of other objects: http://www.redbubble.com/people/domin…

Also you can download a digital version here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/9586967…

I made the music, which you can find on my Soundcloud if you’d like to get lost in some cosmic jam. https://soundcloud.com/dominicwalliman

Errata and clarifications.

I endeavour to be as accurate as possible in my videos, but I am human and definitely don’t know everything, so there are sometimes mistakes. Also, due to the nature of my videos, there are bound to be oversimplifications. Some of these are intentional because I don’t have time to go into full detail, but sometimes they are unintentional and here is where I clear them up.

1. “Isaac Newton invented calculus.” Actually there is controversy over who invented calculus first Isaac Newton or Gottfried Leibniz. Regardless of who it was I have used Leibniz’s mathematical notation here and so he definitely deserves credit. I did’t know about all this so thanks to those who pointed it out. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leibniz…
2. “Maxwell derived the laws of electromagnetism.” This is a simplification as Maxwell’s work was built on the backs of other scientists like Hans Christian Ørsted, André-Marie Ampère and Michael Faraday who discovered induction and saw that electricity and magnetism were part of the same thing. But it was Maxwell who worked out all the maths and brought electricity and magnetism together into a unified theory. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electro…
3. “Entropy is a measure of order and disorder”. This is also a simplification and this does a good job of explaining it better https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entropy
4. Einstein and Quantum physics: I made it sound like quantum physics was built by people other than Einstein, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Einstein got a Nobel prize for his work on the photoelectric effect which was a key result to show the particle-like nature of light. Funnily enough he never got a nobel prize for his work on Relativity!

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.

Related Arttextum Artists:

David Peña Lopera, artista Arttextum
David Peña Lopera
Nicola Noemi Coppola, artista Arttextum
Nicola Noemi Coppola
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas

 

Watch This Guy Build a Massive Solar System in the Desert | Short Film Showcase

Authors: Wylie Overstreet & Alex Gorosh
Via YouTube | March 2, 2017

 

The vastness of space is almost too mind-boggling for the human brain to comprehend. In order to accurately illustrate our place in the universe, one group of friends decided to build the first scale model of the solar system in seven miles of empty desert. Watch a beautiful representation of our universe come together in light and space in this extraordinary short film.

About Short Film Showcase:
The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners. Email SFS@ngs.org to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic’s Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

.

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Glenda León, artista Arttextum
Glenda León
Gilberto Esparza, artista Arttextum
Gilberto Esparza
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas

Defiende tu derecho a ver las estrellas

Autor: AGENTES DEL CAMBIO
Vía AENA ALEPH | Agosto 30, 2016

El International Dark Sky Places Program se dedica a proteger los sitios del mundo que nos permiten ver el cielo oscuro: las estrellas.

Con todos los programas ambientalistas para proteger los bosques, los océanos y los ríos, olvidamos que también hay que proteger aquello que pareciera no ser inmediatamente relevante para la salud planetaria, pero es imprescindible para su eufonía: la oscuridad de los cielos. Para ello existe la organización llamada International Dark Sky Places Program (o IDA), que se dedica a promover la preservación y protección de los cielos nocturnos alrededor del globo.

Tres tipos de áreas componen el programa; comunidades, parques y reservas. Los parques y reservas de IDA son casa de los cielos más oscuros y prístinos del mundo. Las comunidades del programa están repletas de personas preocupadas por los muchos factores de los que depende un cielo oscuro y, mientras sus cielos pueden no ser perfectos, son ejemplos al mundo de cómo una ciudad puede iluminar sus calles sin iluminar el cielo que las cubre.

Estas locaciones son recordatorios de que, sin la inspiración de los cielos y sus cuerpos celestes, mucha de la historia de la Tierra no se hubiera escrito. Mucho del arte, la cultura, la música y la literatura simplemente no hubiera sido creado. Además, el cielo nocturno, entre otras cosas, nos vincula con el pasado y el futuro; cuando volteamos al cielo, las estrellas y los planetas que vemos son las mismas que por generaciones vieron aquellos que miraron el cielo, y las que verán las generaciones que nos siguen. La exploración del espacio es tan vieja como la humanidad, y de allí, más que de ningún otro lado, ha surgido la creatividad. Esta es la razón por la cual el programa de IDA busca proteger las locaciones con vistas excepcionales de la noche, y proponen programas diseñados para inspirar a otros a apreciar el cielo y regresar la noche a los niños y a las personas citadinas.

Entre las comunidades protegidas por IDA de la contaminación de la luz están la Isla de Coll, en Escocia, Dripping Springs, en Texas, la Isla de Sark, en las Islas del Canal, Homer Glen, en Illinois, Borrego Springs, en California y Flagstaff, en Arizona. Los parques y reservas se pueden consultar aquí.

Cualquier persona puede registrarse para inscribir una ciudad o para ayudar a salvar los cielos, una estrella a la vez. Habrá en la historia pocas empresas más sanas y poéticas que reclamar la noche del mundo.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Bárbara Santos, artista Arttextum
Bárbara Santos
Glenda León, artista Arttextum
Glenda León

¿Se puede aprender a ser artista?

¿Se puede aprender a ser artista?

Autor: 
Vía Jotdown | Marzo 2017

Artículo recomendado por Cindy Elizondo, colaboradora de Costa Rica para Replicación de Arttextum

Tenemos una imagen del artista. Y es una imagen de la que es difícil escapar, muy formada, fija, casi cincelada en mármol: el artista es una persona solitaria y ensimismada en su investigación y su trabajo. Una persona con un talento especial, un don recibido por los hados o las musas y que manifiesta desde la infancia más temprana. Alguien destinado, predestinado al arte.

¿Pues saben una cosa? Esa imagen es más falsa que un Velázquez comprado en el Retiro. Sí, es cierto que un creador puede tener aptitudes más o menos naturales. Una sensibilidad más enfocada o una predisposición a observar e interpretar el mundo, pero lo más probable es que no tenga nada que ver con infusiones divinas, sino con la educación, lo familiar o lo ambiental. Incluso algo tan intangible, tan aparentemente hermético como el genio, también se puede aprender. Y enseñar.

El propio Diego Velázquez no emergió de una marmita de gracia artística. Su talento ya se apreciaba en la infancia, sí, pero nunca como un encapsulado prodigio. A Velázquez le enseñaron. Le enseñaron el «arte bien y cumplidamente según como vos lo sabéis sin encubrir de él cosa alguna.» Así rezaba parte del contrato que su padre, Juan Rodríguez de Silva, firmó con el pintor sevillano Francisco Pacheco. Diego tenía once años y aprendió, ya lo creo que aprendió. Aprendió a moler los colores, a decantar los barnices y a tensar los lienzos. Y aprendió a dibujar, porque Pacheco, que más tarde se convertiría en su suegro, no era un gran pintor pero era un excelente dibujante a lápiz y a carbón. Velázquez aprendió a delimitar contornos, a usar las sombras y a generar expresiones. En cien estudios y retratos, Diego aprendió todo lo que pudo, todo lo que Pacheco sabía sin ocultarle ninguna cosa. Y cuando ya no tuvo más que aprender, aprendió a buscar su propio camino. Aprendió a ir más allá. Aprendió a pintar lo que no existía en el lienzo ni en la figura. Lo que había en el medio. Aprendió a pintar el aire.

Sueño de San José, Francisco Pacheco, 1617 y Adoración de los Magos, Diego Velázquez, 1619.
Sueño de San José, Francisco Pacheco, 1617 y Adoración de los Magos, Diego Velázquez, 1619.

La arquitectura es la disciplina artística menos artística de todas, sobre todo desde la eclosión del Movimiento Moderno a principios del siglo XX. La arquitectura siempre responde a un programa y a una función porque siempre debe cumplir la función y el programa para los que ha sido concebida. Y además debe ser sólida, consistente y resistente; literalmente, no como característica conceptual. Los edificios tienen que mantenerse en pie. La arquitectura es el arte más profesional de todos porque debe cumplir la utilitas y la firmitas vitruvianas. Pero, ¿y la venustas? ¿Y la belleza? ¿Se puede enseñar la belleza arquitectónica?

Eduardo Souto de Moura nació en Oporto en 1959. Su padre, José Alberto, era cirujano oftalmólogo y de él aprendió la exactitud y la precisión. De su madre, Maria Teresa Ramos, aprendió la dedicación y el trabajo constante. Maria Teresa era ama de casa. Souto de Moura estudió en la Escola Superior de Belas Artes de Porto antes de que se convirtiese en Facultad de Arquitectura. La arquitectura era una de las bellas artes y allí aprendió a que sus edificios fuesen útiles, fuesen firmes y también a que fuesen bellos. Aunque aún no tenía del todo claro dónde estaba la belleza en la arquitectura. Aún sin terminar la carrera, trabajó durante cinco años en el estudio de Álvaro Siza Vieira, el gran maestro de la arquitectura portuguesa. De Siza aprendió el respeto por el contexto, por el lugar y por el tiempo. Aprendió que los edificios pertenecían a una tradición material e incluso simbólica, a veces transnacional y a veces vernácula. Allí comprendió que la belleza de la arquitectura no se podía aislar, sino que se conformaba por un agregado poliédrico de múltiples características interconectadas e interrelacionadas. Que todo contribuía a generarla. La belleza era imposible sin exactitud y precisión, sin dedicación y trabajo continuo, sin utilidad y resistencia, sin comprensión del tiempo, el lugar y el mundo. Quizá nunca supere a su maestro, pero de él también aprendió a volar libre, porque fue el propio Siza quien insistió una y otra vez en que abriese su propio despacho. Y así lo hizo en 1980, al poco de licenciarse. Eduardo Souto de Moura fue galardonado con el Premio Pritzker en 2011. Álvaro Siza lo había recibido en 1992.

A veces, el aprendizaje no es vernáculo sino exterior. Y eso pasa en cualquier disciplina, también en el arte.

Cristina Iglesias comenzó la carrera de Ciencias Químicas pero la abandonó enseguida para estudiar arte. Seguramente algo tendría que ver con la pequeña nube noosférica que sobrevolaba su familia y que hizo que todos los hermanos —los cinco— acabasen dedicados a profesiones creativas: desde el compositor Alberto hasta la escritora y guionista Lourdes. Cuando ya había cumplido veinte años, Cristina abandonó su Donostia natal para aprender dibujo y cerámica en Barcelona. Allí descubrió la escultura y el barro: «Me interesaba ese material moldeable al que podía añadir color.» Pero Iglesias quería buscar nuevos lenguajes que no podía encontrar en Barcelona. Así que, en 1980, se marchó a Londres, a la Chelsea School of Art. En la capital británica todo era distinto, era más abierto, menos atado al clasicismo o al academicismo. Surgía la new british sculpture y surgían figuras como Tony Cragg, Richard Wentworth o Anish Kapoor.

Cloud Gate de Anish Kapoor, instalada en Chicago en 2004 y las puertas de la ampliación Museo del Prado de Madrid, obra de Cristina Iglesias de 2007. Fotografías: Steve Wright Jr. y Jacinta Lluch Valero (CC)
Cloud Gate de Anish Kapoor, instalada en Chicago en 2004 y las puertas de la ampliación Museo del Prado de Madrid, obra de Cristina Iglesias de 2007. Fotografías: Steve Wright Jr. y Jacinta Lluch Valero (CC)

Cristina Iglesias aprendió de todos ellos. De Kragg aprendió la articulación sinuosa, de Wentworth aprendió la yuxtaposición de materiales y elementos que no suelen estar juntos, de Kapoor aprendió la distorsionada reflexión de la luz. Y no les hizo caso a ninguno de ellos. Por eso, cuando recibió el Premio Nacional de Artes Plásticas en 1999, nadie pudo encontrar influencias directas en sus superficies rugosas y matéricas o en sus intrincadas celosías. Porque Iglesias siempre quiso trabajar en el lateral de la corriente. Y quizá fue ese su mayor aprendizaje: que la verdadera enseñanza reside en el pensamiento, no en la imitación.

Y también hay casos en los que no se aprende de maestros y ni siquiera de colegas de disciplina; se aprende de coetáneos y de amigos. Se aprende de un ambiente generacional. Y todos aprenden de todos.

Cuando llegó a Madrid a los dieciocho años, Pedro Almodóvar no llevaba una maleta de cartón, sino el maletín de maquillaje de Patty Diphusa. En La Mancha de su infancia había aprendido que no quería saber nada de La Mancha ni de su infancia, que no quería saber nada del mundo en el que había crecido. Quería un mundo distinto y quería contarlo en una pantalla y, aunque no pudo matricularse en la escuela de cine, le dio igual porque aprendería de todo lo demás. Y todo lo demás era, literalmente, todo. Almodóvar aprendió del aire nuevo y de las calles nuevas. Aprendió del porno, de la cultura y de la contracultura. De El Víbora y de Diario 16. Aprendió de Félix Rotaeta y de Carmen Maura y de Ana Curra y de Alaska y de Carlos Berlanga y de Fabio McNamara y de Alberto García-Alix. Todos amigos y todos coetáneos. Todos movidos en la Movida. Y todos aprendieron de él. Todos aprendieron a mearse delante de la cámara, a estar al borde de un ataque de nervios, a disfrutar de las grandes gangas y a mirarse el lado femenino.

Y todos se enseñaron y todos aprendieron a crecer y a entender el pasado. A entender que Madrid les pertenecía como les pertenecía México, León, El Escorial o Calzada de Calatrava. Y Almodóvar siguió aprendiendo, entre Óscars, Goyas, Césars, BAFTAs y Davides de Donatello. Entre el Premio Nacional de Cinematografía y el Premio Príncipe de Asturias aprendió incluso a Volver. También aprendió de Russ Meyer, de John Waters o de David Lynch, como lo había hecho de Fernando Colomo y de Alfonso Marsillach. Y ellos aprendieron de Almodóvar. Hasta ahora y desde el principio.

Desde el principio enseñan en la Escuela de Profesiones Artísticas SUR fundada por el Círculo de Bellas Artes y La Fábrica. Enseñan a aprender. Y a aprenderlo todo de todos. Allí no estará Velázquez, pero sí estará Souto de Moura, Iglesias, Almodóvar y García-Alix. Como estará Luis de Pablo, Oscar Mariné o Eduardo Arroyo. Y también estarán alumnos de todas las edades y procedencias de los que aprender y a los que enseñar. Aprender y enseñar a mezclar colores, a absorber influencias de todos lados, a contemplar el contexto y el tiempo y el lugar, a mirar y a volver o a pensar sin imitar. En definitiva, a querer ser artista. A querer al arte.

Sí, quizá para ser artista solo necesitamos proponérnoslo. Y dejar que nos enseñen.

Imagen de portada: Ana María González, Medellín, Colombia, veintitrés años. Artista plástica. Alumna de SUR. Foto: Luis de las Alas

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Johanna Villamil, artista Arttextum
Johanna Villamil
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Georgina Santos, artista Arttextum
Georgina Santos

How To Open Your 7 Chakras As Explained In a Children’s Show

Network: Nickelodeon
Via: YouTube | March 4, 2016

How to cleanse and open your chakras, a must-see video if you are a beginner 😉

 We believe in your work, that’s why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.

Related Arttextum Artists:

Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Gilberto Esparza, artista Arttextum
Gilberto Esparza
Mick Lorusso, artista Arttextum
Mick Lorusso

Experimento comprueba que la realidad no existe hasta que es observada

Autor: Alejandro Martínez Gallardo
Vía PijamaSurf | Mayo 6, 2015

 

Experimento cuántico muestra que la realidad emerge a través del acto de medición; extrapolar esto pone en entredicho la naturaleza de la realidad en la que creemos movernos y sugiere que la conciencia afecta la materia

Una de las interrogantes más extrañas y fascinantes que genera la física cuántica es la posibilidad de que el mundo que experimentamos esté siendo generado por nuestra percepción del mismo. En términos científicos, que los fenómenos se manifiesten de tal o cual forma según el acto de medición. Y hasta que no son medidos, hasta que la mirada del instrumento no se posa sobre ellos, permanecen en un estado de indefinición que desafía toda lógica: son y no son, están vivos y muertos, son ondas y partículas. O, de otra forma, no existen o son todo a la vez. La potencia infinita del vacío.

Hace unos días, un grupo de científicos australianos publicó los resultados de un experimento que confirma esta noción tan allegada a la física cuántica, probando de alguna manera que la realidad no existe hasta que la medimos, al menos no la realidad en una escala cuántica, que, aunque minúscula, es lo que constituye todas las cosas del universo. El experimento es una recreación de otro experimento propuesto por el recientemente fallecido John Wheeler, el físico que desarrolló la teoría de un universo participante en el que el sujeto no está separado del objeto. Wheeler había sugerido en su experimento de la “decisión dilatada” de una onda-partícula que solo cuando medimos los átomos sus propiedades emergen a la realidad.

Según el comunicado de prensa, los científicos australianos primero lograron atrapar un solo átomo de helio en un estado de condensación Bose-Einstein. Luego se dejó pasar este átomo a través de un par de rayos láser, lo cual creó un patrón de rejilla que actuó como una encrucijada para dispersar la trayectoria del átomo, de la misma forma que una rejilla sólida dispersa la luz. Enseguida, se añadió otra rejilla de luz de forma aleatoria para recombinar los caminos, creando una interferencia, como si el átomo hubiera optado por ambos caminos. Sin esta segunda rejilla, el átomo se comportaba como si solo hubiera elegido un solo camino. Sin embargo, el número aleatorio que determinaba si se añadía la rejilla era generado después de que el átomo pasaba por la encrucijada. Esto sugiere que la medición futura estaba afectando la decisión en el pasado del átomo. Según el doctor Andrew Truscott: “Los átomos no viajaron de A a B. Fue solo cuando se midieron al final del viaje que existió el comportamiento ondulatorio o de partícula”.

Esta es una prueba más del quantum weirdness o la extraña naturaleza de la realidad que, si ponemos atención, merece que cuestionemos muchas de nuestras creencias sobre cómo funciona el universo. Explicar por qué sucede esto es sumamente complejo y por el momento altamente especulativo. Sin embargo, una de las explicaciones que más tracción tiene es la posibilidad de que la conciencia sea una propiedad constitutiva del universo. Si la conciencia también existe a nivel cuántico este tipo de comportamientos podría explicarse como el efecto de mente sobre materia.

la-realidad-no-existe-arttextum

Analizando un experimento previo cuya intención fue demostrar el mismo fenómeno el doctor Dean Radin, del Noetic Institute, escribió:

La medición cuántica es un problema ya que viola la doctrina comúnmente aceptada del realismo, que asume que el mundo en general es independiente de la observación. El conflicto entre el realismo ingenuo y lo que implica el problema de medición cuántica obligó a muchos de los pioneros de la teoría cuántica a considerar el significado de observación y medición. Algunos como Pauli, Jordan y Wigner creyeron que algún aspecto de la conciencia –refiriéndose a capacidades mentales como la atención, la alerta y la intención– era indispensable para entender la medición cuántica. Jordan escribió: “Las observaciones no solo perturban lo medido, lo producen… Provocamos que el electrón asuma cierta posición definida. Nosotros mismos producimos el resultado de la medición”.

Pese a que existen muchos indicios de que la conciencia debería de entrar en la ecuación, en nuestro modelo de qué es la naturaleza no solamente como un epifenómeno o un fantasma cerebral producido aleatoriamente por la evolución, no vemos que se hagan muchos experimentos con esto en mente. Esta posibilidad, aunque es contemplada filosóficamente por algunos de los científicos más brillantes, no logra romper el huevo paradigmático y aventurarse al proceso de comprobación científica. Dean Radin concluye que:

La noción de que la conciencia puede estar relacionada a la formación de la realidad física ha sido asociada más con la magia medieval y las ideas new age que con la ciencia sobria. Como resultado, es más seguro para la carrera de un científico evitar relacionarse con temas tan dudosos y subsecuentemente los experimentos que examinan  estas ideas son difíciles de encontrar en la física. De hecho el tabú es tan grande que hasta hace poco se había extendido a todo examen sobre los fundamentos de la teoría cuántica. Por más de 50 años estos experimentos se han considerado inapropiados para un investigador serio.

Imágenes: PijamaSurf y Erminauta

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


Artistas de Arttextum relacionados:

Mick Lorusso, artista Arttextum
Mick Lorusso
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Joana Moll, artista Arttextum
Joana Moll

Malala’s father: “She is the spirit of happiness in this house”

Author: Abigail Pesta
Via The NY Times | February 29, 2016

 

As the teenage Nobel prize winner prepares for her next step — college — her father tells Women in the World about how she is adjusting to her new life in England

When 15-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head on her school bus by the Taliban, a devastating thought crossed her father’s mind: Was he to blame?

Malala’s dad, Ziauddin Yousafzai, had strongly encouraged his daughter to pursue an education in Pakistan, defying the Taliban order that girls should not go to school, but should stay silent, marry young, and obey their husbands.

“When something bad happens, an honest person asks himself, what was my role? I think this is natural. The day Malala was shot was the most difficult day of my life. In that moment, it came to my mind, yes, could I have done differently? Could I have stopped her? I asked my wife if I had done the right thing,” Ziauddin told Women in the World by phone from England, where the family now lives. “My wife said, ‘Yes, you did the right thing. You and Malala are fighting for education, for equality. You are standing for your rights.’”

His moment of doubt passed, but he and his wife had to wait in agony for a week, wondering if their daughter would wake up from a coma. When she did, her first words, scribbled with a pen, were about her dad. “Why have I no father?” she asked, fearing he could be dead.

Ziauddin’s influence on his daughter’s life runs deep. In the documentary He Named Me Malala, which has its global television premiere on Monday night on the National Geographic Channel, it is clear how he raised his daughter to shun the patriarchal, tribal notions of a girl’s role of subservience in society. A schoolteacher and outspoken critic of the Taliban, he sent Malala to school at a young age and urged her to talk about politics and topics often reserved for boys. “I tried my best to treat my daughter as myself,” he told Women in the World. “I gave her a lot of freedom.”

He encouraged Malala to stay in school when she entered her teenage years — a time when Pakistani girls are typically “stopped from going out of the home” and married off, he said. He recalled how a man once complained to Malala’s mother that Malala was showing herself in public, continuing to go to school. “He said, ‘Malala brings shame to the family. You should not be doing this.’ When my wife told me this, I said, ‘This is my family. He should not poke his nose into my family affairs.’” Now, the same man “is a big supporter of Malala,” Ziauddin said. “Change starts in the close family, then it goes to the extended family, then it spreads to towns and cities and countries.”

Thoughout her school years in the Swat Valley, Malala became increasingly upset about how the Taliban targeted and bombed schools for girls. When a BBC correspondent asked her father if a girl at his school would anonymously blog about the situation, Ziauddin asked Malala if she would be interested. She said yes. Later she appeared with her dad in a video by New York Times reporter Adam B. Ellick, showing her face and saying she wanted to become a doctor. She began speaking publicly at events, campaigning for education for girls. In October 2012, a gunman boarded her school bus, asked for her by name, and gunned her down. She was not expected to survive. She was flown to a hospital in Birmingham, England, for medical care, and her family followed. Doctors performed brain surgery, attaching a metal plate to her skull and a cochlear implant to restore hearing to her left ear. Part of her face remains paralyzed.

Malala has struggled to adjust to school in the West. “Just think of a young girl who was studying in a far-flung area of Pakistan and had never been together with girls from the U.K., whose country and culture is different,” Ziauddin said. In the film, Malala talks about how the girls at her high school in England are busy dating boys. “Most of them have boyfriends. Most of them have broken up with some of the boyfriends and found new ones,” she says. In her native Pakistan, there was no dating, just marriage. If a family had a television, the Taliban burned it. And if people spoke out against the Taliban, they got executed in the town square.

“It was quite hard in the beginning for Malala,” Ziauddin said of his daughter’s new life. “But I must give her credit. She is so resilient and such a smart girl, she was able to get used to her new environment and make friends.” In the film, Malala surfs the Internet and giggles about a favorite Pakistani cricket player and tennis star Roger Federer. She enjoys mini-golf, bowling, and “fighting with her brothers,” her father told Women in the World with a laugh. “She is the spirit of happiness in this house. This house is like a dungeon without her.” Malala has two younger brothers, also attending school in England. Malala’s mother, Toor Pekai Yousafzai, is getting educated as well, learning to read and write, she said last October at the Women in the World Summit in London.

Malala’s school has made a point of treating her “as a normal student,” Ziauddin said. When she won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, that was the first time she addressed the school, he said. Now 18 years old, Malala is applying to college and is interested in Oxford University, among others, her father said. He added that he will feel sad when she leaves home, but also “very pleased” to see her move forward with her schooling. In describing his hopes for her, he recalled a trip he took with her to Islamabad before the attack. “We went to a function and she gave a talk as if she was my son. My dream for her then was that one day, I want to see Malala come here to Islamabad on her own to give this talk, no chaperone. She should be independent. When she goes to college, she will be independent. She will be on her own. We will be good.”

Ziauddin grew up with five sisters, none of whom were given the opportunity for an education in Pakistan. They were married off, and never had an identity of their own. “No girl was given an education when I was a schoolboy,” he said. “I saw so much discrimination. Many men in society, they are comfortable with what is going on. Few people stand for change. Whatever I saw wrong in my early life, I wanted to respond with equality and justice. My goal was not to condemn, but to change.”

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Regina José Galindo, artista Arttextum
Regina José Galindo
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Edith López Ovalle, artista Arttextum
Edith López Ovalle

Leidenfrost effect- really cool maze of moving droplets at end

Leidenfrost effect- really cool maze of moving droplets at end

Author: SciFri
Via: Science Friday | November 21, 2013

Video recommended by Mick Lorusso from the USA / Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

In the Leidenfrost Effect, a water droplet will float on a layer of its own vapor if heated to certain temperature. This common cooking phenomenon takes center stage in a series of playful experiments by physicists at the University of Bath, who discovered new and fun means to manipulate the movement of water.

Researchers test ridged surfaces in order to control the movements of hot water.

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Gilberto Esparza, artista Arttextum
Gilberto Esparza
Mick Lorusso, artista Arttextum
Mick Lorusso
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas

School Replaces Detention With Meditation And Results Are Amazing

Author: James Gould-Bourn
Via Bored Panda | October, 2016

 

Robert W. Coleman School in Baltimore sounds like the best school ever. Why? Because there’s no such thing as detention at the Baltimore Elementary.

Yep, you heard that correctly. Instead they have a Mindful Moment Room, a brightly colored “oasis of calm” that looks about as far as you can get from the windowless detention rooms typically used to punish unruly kids. It’s part of an after-school programme called Holistic Me, an initiative that teaches children to practice mindful meditation and breathing exercises while encouraging them to talk to behavioral professionals. The programme works in partnership with a local non-profit called the Holistic Life Foundation, and the results so far have been pretty impressive. In fact, since first taking part in the programme two years ago, Robert W. Coleman hasn’t issued a single suspension.

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Rita Ponce de León, artista Arttextum
Rita Ponce de León
Rossana Martinez, artista Arttextum
Rossana Martínez
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas

 

These Two Women Designed A 3D Zebra Crossing In Gujarat And It’s One Of A Kind!

Author: Souvik Ray
Via India Times | Marzo 10, 2016

 

3D street art never fails to amaze us. Simply because they have a visual appeal that one can just immerse themselves in.

Artists Saumya Pandya Thakkar and Shakuntala Pandya from Ahmedabad designed something innovative that not only serves an artistic purpose but ensures road safety for pedestrians.The motto was to increase the attention of drivers through new flat patterns of Zebra Crossings.

The authorities have tested the effects in Ahmedabad and has approved it as successful concept till now. However there are limitations in designs due to the highway norms and the artist has just applied the ordered design by connected authorities. The design has been eligible for the copyright as well.

The 3-dimensional zebra crossing gives an illusion to oncoming drivers that it is a blockade, hence making them slow down. The novel idea will be used near schools and accident prone areas in Ahmedabad to reduce road related accidents and allow pedestrians to safely cross the road.

We believe in your work, that's why we share it with original links; if you disagree, please contact us.


Related Arttextum Artists:

Marilyn Boror Bor, artista Arttextum
Marilyn Boror Bor
Marcela Armas, artista Arttextum
Marcela Armas
Grupo Recicla Sustenta, colectivo Arttextum
Grupo Recicla Sustenta