Declaran patrimonio cultural e inmaterial vestimentas regionales de Oaxaca

Autor: Redacción ADN
Vía ADN Sureste | Marzo 2, 2016

San Raymundo Jalpan, Oax., 2 de marzo. La LXII Legislatura del Congreso Estatal, declaró como Patrimonio Cultural e Inmaterial de Oaxaca, los diseños, vestimentas o trajes regionales característicos de las comunidades de pueblos indígenas reconocidos en la Constitución del Estado, las artesanías que en ellas se producen, así como las lenguas habladas por dichas poblaciones.
De acuerdo al dictamen aprobado por mayoría, se establece que los pueblos y comunidades indígenas tienen derecho social a mantener, desarrollar, preservar y proteger sus propias identidades y los elementos que lo conforman. Adiciona también preservar sus tradiciones y costumbres a través de programas culturales y políticas públicas, para apoyar la conservación de textiles y diseño.

En dicho documento, se establece que esta acción permitirá la generación de mecanismos pertinentes en coordinación con los pueblos y comunidades para la protección de cada uno de los elementos.

El dictamen aprobado tiene como antecedente, iniciativas presentadas por las y los diputados Jaime Bolaños Cacho Guzmán, integrante de la Fracción Parlamentaria del Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD), Alejandro Martínez Ramírez del Partido Acción Nacional (PAN), Martha Alicia Escamilla León y María Lilia Arcelia Mendoza Cruz del Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI).

En la exposición de motivos, el dictamen refiere que la expresión “Patrimonio Cultural”  ha cambiado en las últimas décadas; debido en parte a los instrumentos elaborados por la UNESCO. Refiere que el patrimonio cultural no se limita a monumentos, sino que  comprende también tradiciones o expresiones vivas heredadas y transmitidas a las nuevas generaciones, como tradiciones orales, artes del espectáculo, actos festivos y saberes y técnicas vinculadas a la artesanía tradicional.

En los antecedentes que dieron origen a la declaratoria, se indica que en julio de 2015, una diseñadora francesa, presentó como propia una blusa tradicional de la comunidad de Santa María Tlahuitoltepec, Mixe, con ello se inició un juicio para defender los derechos de la prenda a través de una empresa que pretende obtener la patente del diseño tradicional y así comenzar la explotación comercial del bordado.

En este contexto, las Comisiones Permanentes Unidas de Asuntos Indígenas y de Cultura, propusieron generar un tratamiento prioritario en los programas de conservación, protección, investigación, catalogación, revaloración, difusión, intervención, custodia y rehabilitación de la riqueza cultural antes mencionada.

trajes-regionales-arttextum-replicacion.jpg

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How art allowed me to erase borders | Ana Teresa Fernández | TEDxPennsylvaniaAvenue

By: TEDx Talks
Via YouTube | August 25, 2017

As an artist, Ana Teresa Fernandez uses her imagination as her weapon to challenge today’s political rhetoric by erasing borders with sky blue paint and wearing ice stilettos in the streets of Oakland. She re-tells myths and folklore that cements us to limited ways of thinking, and paints alternate truths to tear down psychological and physical barriers.
TBT Feb 9th 2017, at Newseum in Capitol Hill, at one of the most difficult professional moments … Delia Cohen, the TEDX consultant & I clocked in over 18 hrs of skype meetings, and close to 30 written drafts for my talk in just one month. We finished the last draft 48 hrs before I got on a plane to Washington DC, and which I had to memorize word for word. She had asked the coordinator to get me an extension & allow my talk to be 16 min instead of 12. “Every word matters” Delia kept saying, “and all these stories need to be told!” I was the only artist & youngest person on TEDX Pennsylvania Ave. amidst politicians & greats like Philippe Cousteau & Sonia Nazario. Nervous is not even close to being the right word. The pressure of that platform is unlike anything I’ve ever experienced. All speakers sat like ghosts in the green room, trying to find a closet or corner to collect ourselves before going out to speak. I remember Philippe hid himself between two big recycling bins, and put his head between his knees. Someone did jumping jacks. Those words I memorized my bones already knew so well. Undressing your skin to reveal what’s inside is the hardest part. What people don’t know is that after the talk & reception I got to my hotel room and sat on the floor crying, beating myself up over and over, thinking I could have done better, fought harder, been a better voice for artists, but also scared & so exposed to have opened up so much. Feeling a huge vulnerability- hang over. The political change was palpable in Capitol Hill. And I was terrified of what was to come with this presidency, to us artists, to migrants to so many people … So, I called my mom, and from across the US she helped me to collect myself again. Saying “Gordita está bien… día a día” it’s ok, one day at a time. Today you did the best you could… “
Image Credit: SF Weekly

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The artist who made protesters’ mirrored shields says the ‘struggle porn’ media miss point of Standing Rock

The artist who made protesters’ mirrored shields says the ‘struggle porn’ media miss point of Standing Rock

By: Carolina A. Miranda
Via Los Angeles Times| January 24, 2017

Website recommended by Mick Lorusso from the US/Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

For Cannupa Hanska Luger, the protests at Standing Rock are personal. The artist, who makes sculpture, video and installations, was born on the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota, and he is an enrolled member of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, whose territory is nearby. He is in possession of German and Norwegian blood too. “I am North Dakota,” he jokes.

Now based in New Mexico, where he was recently an artist in residence at the Institute of American Indian Arts, he has been traveling to his home state over the last nine months to support the encampment in opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline. Though many protesters left the site after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers denied a permit for the pipeline in early December — and after a hard winter set in — the encampment is still active.

In this lightly edited telephone conversation, which took place late in December, he discusses what it’s been like to watch the protests evolve, why these have been so important to Native American culture and what inspired him to produce mirrored shields to help protect activists on the front lines.

What was it like to see Standing Rock develop into one of the major news events of 2016?

It’s been pretty interesting — even more so being from that region and growing up around there. When we were kids, we used to fish and dive off of those bridges that are now the front lines. That river is home. I go back every summer guaranteed. I’ve been up seven or eight times since this whole thing began.

My dad’s side of the family, they have a ranch in the Standing Rock reservation. My mom’s side is from Fort Berthold [reservation], which is where the current oil fields are. I watched that community get destroyed by the extraction of oil. I’ve seen wells poisoned. I’ve seen the cycles of boom and bust.

A lot of artists I’ve spoken with have described their journeys to the Standing Rock encampment as transformative.

It seems like everyone who has interacted with the space, there is something transformative that has happened there. The media’s general interest is in “struggle porn,” so people have missed what is beautiful about it.

When you first come through the gate — there is one entrance and one exit — they look through your car. They ask you if you have weapons or drugs. Then you are welcomed in, and they say, “Welcome home.” Your first interaction is being included, which is not something that people are used to in this country. This is an exclusive country. It’s all about fences and borders.

You set up camp and someone gives you firewood. The whole thing of guarding your stuff goes away. It’s so much easier to share things. Culturally we have a practice called “seven generations.” As you walk through the world, you are not yourself. You are not a singularity. You are not an American individualist bootstrapping bull …. You are only borrowing this place from children you will never meet. And the only reason you have an opportunity to do that is because elders took care of it for you.

Everybody came in hoping to experience something new, something profound. But when they got there, they realized they’re not a part of something new, they’ve just been absorbed into something that is much older than the entire country. That’s incredibly humbling.

What do you think Standing Rock has done for society’s understanding of indigenous culture and issues?

The big difference is that I think [people have] had the opportunity to encounter us not as a mystic, romantic other. It’s just like, “Dude, we’re just human beings.” What does “Lakota” mean in English? It literally means “the people.”

This is why we say this is not a protest, why we are water protectors. We’re not just in protest of a pipeline. What we are trying to do is maintain a cultural practice. This is our culture. It’s a part of our society.

Our original bible, that comes down from on high, it is the land. We have an oral tradition and we tell stories about magical characters that are bound to the landscape, that are bound to geology. Why is that stone red? There is a story. So where everyone else sees a pipeline and “progress,” what we see is someone going through our bible and editing things without any care, ripping a line straight through that story.

The media’s general interest is in ‘struggle porn,’ so people have missed what is beautiful about it.— Artist Cannupa Hanska Luger on the Standing Rock protests

The battle for the pipeline isn’t over, but having the Army Corps of Engineers deny the permit certainly stands as an important victory.

The amazing thing is that whether you were Native or not, what we witnessed up there is the awakening of a giant that has been sleeping. It’s the power of us as living things — rather than us waiting for somebody to save us. It was so grass roots.

Native people have never been subject to that amount of solidarity. It left everybody awestruck. And the number of Native people coming together, nothing like this has been seen since the 19th century. Enemies that had previously been enemies, coming together — there’s no way for me to describe to you what that means. It’s far too profound.

 

arttextum-replicacion-la-times2

You made a series of mirrored shields that you distributed to people on the front lines. How did that come about?

I was inspired by these activists in the Ukraine. These women — old women and children — and they came out and carried mirrors from their bathrooms and into the street to show these riot policemen what they looked like. From the photos I saw, it seemed profoundly effective. I wanted to bring that same level of recognition to the front lines there.

But Standing Rock is in the middle of nowhere. I didn’t want people to bring mirrors to the front line and get hit with batons and cause more damage than good. So what we needed was a mirrored shield. So I came up with a simple, easy and cheap design to make these mirrored shields using vinyl and Masonite — materials you can find in any hardware store. From one sheet of Masonite, you could make six shields.

I started making them after that Sunday that they were hitting people with hoses. I personally made close to 100 of them. But then another group out of Minneapolis made 500. I have no idea how many are in circulation. But I keep seeing them here and there.

What role do you think artists can have in protest?

 

Being an artist, it is a way to weaponize privilege. I could have been on the front line a dozen times, but my wife said, “You are one person there; you are 10,000 here — where you can engage all of these resources.”

I did a mural at the Center for Civil and Human Rights [in Atlanta] about these issues because I had the opportunity. And if I don’t utilize every amount of privilege for a cause that’s worthwhile, then what is the point? If I am not for you, then who am I for?Artists, we live on the periphery. But we are the mirrors. We are the reflective points that break through a barrier. You don’t have to be in the same economic place that I am to relate to the work that I make. That is the power of art.

We are not rich people. But we are incredibly wealthy. We have ideas.

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See How Dancing Helps This Young Refugee Feel Welcome in a New Country | Short Film Showcase

By: National Geographic
Via YouTube | February 2, 2018

Meet Zain Younus—Pakistani refugee and dedicated Michael Jackson fan. In this touching story from Joshua Seftel of Smartypants, watch Zain transform into a “new American boy” as he performs his idol’s dance moves in the school talent show.
Due to escalating violence in his home country, Zain was granted asylum in the United States and has settled in New York City with his family. Eager to adjust to life in America, the 13-year-old and his siblings are attending a “refugee summer camp” that will help them improve their English language skills.
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Artforum

Artforum

Founder: John P. Irwin, Jr.
Via Artforum

Magazine recommended by Sandra Gael from México, collaborator for Arttextum’s Replicación

Artforum is an international monthly magazine specializing in contemporary art. Artforum was founded in 1962 in San Francisco by John P. Irwin, Jr. The next publisher/owner Charles Cowles moved the magazine to Los Angeles in 1965 before finally settling it in New York City in 1967, where it maintains offices today. The move to New York also encompassed a shift in the style of work championed by the magazine, moving away from California style art to Late modernism, then the leading style of art in New York City. The departure of Philip Leider as editor-in-chief in 1971; and the tenure of John Coplans as the new editor-in-chief roughly coincided with a shift towards more fashionable trends and away from Late modernism. A focus on Minimal Art, Conceptual Art, Body art, Land art and Performance art provided a platform for artists such as Robert Smithson, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt and others. In 1980 after opening his own gallery in New York City Charles Cowles divested himself of the magazine.

Image: Wikipedia

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UbuWeb

UbuWeb

Autor: UbuWeb
Vía UbuWeb

Web link recomendado por María José Alós, colaboradora de México para Replicación de Arttextum

UbuWeb es un sitio web sobre arte vanguardista. Fue fundado en 1996 por el poeta Kenneth Goldsmith.​
Allí puede encontrarse poesía concreta y sonora, archivos de video-arte, cine underground y Arte sonoro.

Imagen de portada: EntreVoir

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


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Celebrating the 117th birthday of the influential filmmaker and visual artist Oskar Fischinger

Celebrating the 117th birthday of the influential filmmaker and visual artist Oskar Fischinger

Creative Lead: Leon Hong
Via Google Doodle | June 22, 2017

Web link recommended by Fernanda Mejía from Colombia/Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

I first discovered Fischinger’s work in a college class on visual music. His films, most of which were made from the 1920s to 1940s, left me awed and puzzled — how could he make such magic without computers?

Film-Flip book, 1970. Courtesy of Angie Fischinger
Film-Flip book, 1970.
Courtesy of Angie Fischinger

In the world of design, Fischinger is a towering figure, especially in the areas of motion graphics and animation. He is best known for his ability to combine impeccably synchronized abstract visuals with musical accompaniment, each frame carefully drawn or photographed by hand. A master of motion and color, Fischinger spent months — sometimes years — planning and handcrafting his animations.

Outward Movement, 1948. Oil on canvas.
Outward Movement, 1948. Favorite painting of Angie Fischinger, Oskars youngest child.
Courtesy of Angie Fischinger

Although mostly known for his films, Fischinger was also a prolific painter, creating numerous works that capture the dramatic movement and feeling of his films within a single frame. Unsatisfied with traditional media, he also invented a contraption, the Lumigraph, for generating fantastic chromatic displays with hand movements — a sort of optical painting in motion and a precursor to the interactive media and multi-touch games of today.
Even with the advanced technology that now exists, emulating Fischinger’s work is an impossible task. His colors and motion are so carefully planned yet naturally playful, his timing so precise yet human. So today’s Doodle aims to pay homage to him, while allowing you to compose your own visual music. I hope it inspires you to seek out the magic of Fischinger for yourself.

— Leon Hong, Creative Lead

Click the image to activate the Doodle
Click the image to activate the Doodle

Special thanks to Angie Fischinger, Oskar’s youngest child, who played an integral role in making this project possible. Below, she shares some thoughts about her father’s work and life:

My parents were German immigrants. They were forced to leave Germany in 1936 when it became clear that my father could not pursue his work as a filmmaker there (avant-garde was considered degenerate by Hitler and his administration). But many people who had already seen his films recognized his greatness. He received an offer to work at MGM and stayed in Hollywood after the war.

My father was incredibly dedicated to his art — some even called him stubborn. His passion and honesty were part of his brilliance, but they could also make him a bit difficult to work with. Sometimes our family struggled financially as a result, so everybody pitched in — the kids got paper routes or did babysitting. We were raised in a healthy, hard-working environment. We were happy, intellectually stimulated, and dedicated to education. Thanks to my family’s support and encouragement, I graduated from San Jose State and taught in the public school system for 30 years.

I feel incredibly proud of my family and am delighted to be the daughter of Oskar and Elfriede Fischinger. It means so much to me to see this celebration of my father’s art. It’s wonderful to know that his work, which has been steadily praised since the 1920s, will continue to receive worldwide recognition.

Production

  • Leon HongCreative Lead
  • Kris HomEngineer
  • Brian MurrayEngineer
  • My-Linh LeProducer & Proj Manager

Doodle Support

  • Perla CamposMarketing & Proj Support
  • Marci WindsheimerBlog Editor

Preset Composers

  • Local Natives
  • Nick Zammuto
  • TOKiMONSTA

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


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La fama, la muerte y el arte. Exposición de Andy Warhol “Estrella Oscura”

La fama, la muerte y el arte. Exposición de Andy Warhol “Estrella Oscura”

Autor: Fabián Muhlia
Vía Fabián Muhlia | Junio, 2017

Artículo escrito por Fabián Muhlia, colaborador de México para Replicación de Arttextum

Podría comenzar el escrito con descripciones didácticas y aburridas, pero mi propósito es resaltar lo emocional y humano de la obra de Andy Warhol en la exposición Estrella Oscura, curada por Douglas Fogle y que actualmente se expone en el Museo Jumex, ubicado en Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra en la colonia Granada de la Ciudad de México.

Si hay un miedo que persigue y atormenta al ser humano, es la certeza de que la muerte llegará algún día, muchas veces de la forma menos esperada. Si a este miedo le sumamos el  vivir en función de lo que el mundo capitalista tiene establecido, nos da como resultado una gran crisis existencial, en donde todo tiene que ser ahora: la fama y el éxito deben llegar rápido.

Andy Warhol
Cow Wallpaper (Pink on Yellow)
[Papel tapiz con motivo de vaca (Rosa sobre amarillo)], 1966, (reimpresión 1994)
Serigrafía sobre papel tapiz
Rollo (cada uno): 457.2 x 71.1 cm
Imagen (cada una): 116.8 x 71.1 cm
The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh
Andy Warhol
Cow Wallpaper (Pink on Yellow)
[Papel tapiz con motivo de vaca (Rosa sobre amarillo)], 1966, (reimpresión 1994)
Serigrafía sobre papel tapiz
Rollo (cada uno): 457.2 x 71.1 cm
Imagen (cada una): 116.8 x 71.1 cm
The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh

Menciono lo anterior para abordar la serie de accidentes y suicidios que inspiraron a Warhol para su serie de “desastres” la cual le sirvió de medio para anunciar la muerte del movimiento de expresionismo abstracto, liderado por Jackson Pollock. Es una metáfora muy bien lograda , en donde muestra lo real y lo popular en la cultura y desafía lo establecido en el mercado del arte de aquel tiempo.

Caminar por las salas de exposición y contemplar la belleza de “Orange Disaster #5” en donde Warhol multiplica por 15 la imagen de una silla eléctrica, es maravilloso.

El artista acentuó en dicha obra lo tétrico de la pena de muerte en Estados Unidos, manipuló la imagen como los grandes maestros, transformando algo horroroso en algo estético. Implícitamente la obra nos señala a los verdugos y a los condenados: la obra es de una teatralidad increíble. Algo que ayuda al impacto de la misma es su gran formato.

A lo largo de su producción, Warhol nos habla de una sociedad de consumo y de la gran soledad a la que están sujetos los artistas pertenecientes a Hollywood, para este selecto grupo las puertas se abren hacia un camino donde todo es fácil, instantáneo y grandilocuente, pero también muy cruel.

Los retratos de Marilyn Monroe, Jackie Kennedy, Elvis Presley y Mao (este último en un formato monumental) nos muestran una realidad más accesible, libre de exageración y apasionamiento por parte de los narradores de la historia. Warhol nos brinda seres coloridos, populares y alcanzables por las masas.

Andy Warhol
Jackie (sonriendo), 1964
Pintura de polímero sintético y serigrafía sobre tela
50.8 x 40.6 cm
La Colección Jumex, México
Andy Warhol
Jackie (sonriendo), 1964
Pintura de polímero sintético y serigrafía sobre tela
50.8 x 40.6 cm
La Colección Jumex, México

La genialidad de la concepción de sus obras se ve empatada por la ejecución impecable de las mismas, ya sean instalaciones, serigrafías y técnicas mixtas.

Los invito a ver esta exposición más allá de los retratos, a concentrase en la parte oscura de la fama, en la trampa consumista en la que caemos día a día y que nos hace olvidarnos de las cosas que realmente importan.

Es alentador que se presente una exposición tan completa de Andy Warhol en nuestro país, con un costo muy accesible y con una excelente museografía. A todo esto, hay que añadirle la belleza del museo, diseñado por el arquitecto inglés David Chipperfield.

Stephen Shore
Andy Warhol, 1965-1967
Fotografía blanco y negro
32.4 x 48.3 cm
© Stephen Shore, cortesía 303 Gallery, Nueva York
Stephen Shore
Andy Warhol, 1965-1967
Fotografía blanco y negro
32.4 x 48.3 cm
© Stephen Shore, cortesía 303 Gallery, Nueva York

No puedo dejar de mencionar que resulta irónico, pero también muy divertido, el que no se puedan tomar fotos de la exposición, ya que en nuestro tiempo, los medios nos presionan para compartir nuestra vida en tiempo real, ya sea por medio de selfies o por las diferentes plataformas y redes sociales.

La exposición estará hasta el 17 de septiembre de 2017.

Imágenes amablemente facilitadas al autor por Andrea Gil -Museo Jumex.

Imagen de portada: Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait [Autorretrato], 1964, Acrílico, pintura metálica y tinta de serigrafía sobre lino 51.1x41cm, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution Dia Center for the Arts.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


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Recuentos. Videos sobre la memoria social e histórica de América Latina

Autor: Artishock 
Vía Artishock | Abril 12, 2017

 

Recuentos es un proyecto comisariado por Isabela Villanueva para la galería Espacio Mínimo con obras en formato videográfico de Edgardo Aragón, Marilá Dardot, Claudia Joskowicz y Enrique Ramírez, artistas que exploran distintas maneras de representar acontecimientos, buscan nuevas perspectivas para capturar la memoria social y personal y examinan hechos históricos y sus repercusiones en el entorno físico y simbólico que los rodea. Los une el interés por el proceso reflexivo, pues más que visitar los hechos del pasado y presentar alegorías, les interesa generar correspondencias y analogías con los problemas del presente.

En su documental Matamoros Edgardo Aragón (México) utiliza el formato de “road movie” para recrear los viajes que Pedro Vásquez Reyes realizó múltiples veces desde Oaxaca, en el sur de México, a Tamaulipas, en la frontera norte del país, para traficar drogas a Estados Unidos a finales de los años ochenta. Pero, más que abordar el problema del narcotráfico, o presentar la introspección del protagonista, este video es una reflexión sobre el paisaje mexicano. Matamoros plantea un cuestionamiento sobre la construcción de la memoria, pues lo que se nos presenta son construcciones o visiones y no una realidad fidedigna.

Diário, de la brasileña Marilá Dardot, presenta a la artista escribiendo con agua titulares de prensa impactantes en un muro de concreto, de modo que en instantes éstos se disuelven. Filmado en enero del 2015, el primer titular que aparece es el atentado terrorista de Charlie Hebdo en Francia, y justamente el último narra otro atentado en una mezquita en Pakistán. El video no sólo es un comentario sobre lo efímero de las noticias, sino que además recalca el carácter cíclico de los acontecimientos mundiales y demuestra cómo la historia es una colección de hechos irremediablemente repetitivos y simultáneos.

La instalación de video Sympathy for the Devil, de la boliviana Claudia Joskowicz, recrea un encuentro entre dos vecinos de La Paz, Bolivia: un refugiado judío polaco que emigró a Sudamérica durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y el ex nazi Klaus Barbie, que entonces vivía en Bolivia bajo un pseudónimo. Durante la década de 1970, ambos hombres vivían vidas paralelas como vecinos, mutuamente conscientes de la existencia del otro y encontrándose diariamente en el ascensor. Los videos, filmados por Joskowicz con magistrales tomas largas, se dedican a cuestionar la historia y sus repercusiones en el paisaje físico y simbólico. La obra también aborda la forma en que la tecnología media y redefine la memoria, la realidad y los hechos históricos.

Por último, el filme Pacífico, de Enrique Ramírez (Chile), nos presenta a un mar brusco, impredecible e imponente. El artista utiliza el océano como una alegoría de la historia social y política de América Latina, pero en particular de Chile. Ramírez se está refiriendo específicamente a la Operación Cóndor: la alianza militar y política entre las diversas dictaduras instaladas entre los años 70 y 80 en los países sudamericanos, y a sus prácticas de lanzar cadáveres de prisioneros políticos al mar para hacerlos desaparecer sin rastro para siempre. Para el artista el océano es una metáfora de la carga emotiva de un pasado que no debe ser olvidado.

Estos cuatro artistas, de distintas generaciones y proveniente de distintos países, invocan nuevas formas de representar las memorias y los acontecimientos vividos en un mundo marcado por procesos políticos turbulentos. A través de distintas metodologías Aragón, Dardot, Joskowicz y Ramírez intentan hablar del pasado para llenarlo de nuevas sensaciones que recodifican todos sus significados.

RECUENTOS. EDGARDO ARAGÓN, MARILÁ DARDOT, CLAUDIA JOSKOWICZ Y ENRIQUE RAMÍREZ
Un proyecto de Isabela Villanueva
Galería Espacio Mínimo, Madrid
Del 25 de marzo al 20 de mayo de 2017.

Imagen de portada tomada de Artishockautora Marilá Dardot.

Im.

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Más sobre Claudia Joskowicz artista de Arttextum:

Claudia Joskowicz, artista Arttextum
Claudia Joskowicz

art_life_ny on #body #environment #health #kindness #nutrition #wellness

Rossana Martínez, artista Arttextum

Autor: Rossana Martínez
Vía Instagram

 

Get your daily inspiration from Arttextum’s artist Rossana Martínez, an active and extremely enthusiastic woman who has a lot to share. Here is a quote from her website:

I started mine more than ten years ago when I got tired of feeling tired all the time. “Tired of tired” is what motivated me to try.

To be clear, this is not a five or ten year plan. This is not a diet or training for a race. This is not for a specific age. This is the marathon of life. 
The action of taking time to simply try is the way to get there. And with a clear understanding that we, individually, will shape that healthy lifestyle.

Don’t forget to follow her on Instagram!!!

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More about the artist:

Rossana Martinez, artista Arttextum
Rossana Martínez

4 Non Blondes – What’s Up

Author: Linda Perry
Via YouTube

 

Music video by 4 Non Blondes performing What’s Up. (C) 1992 Interscope Records.

What’s up -lyrics
Twenty-five years and my life is still
Trying to get that great big hill of hope
For a destination
I realized quickly when I knew I should
That the world was made up of this brotherhood of man
For whatever that means
And so I cry sometimes
When I’m lying in bed Just to get it all out
What’s in my head
And I, I am feeling a little peculiar
And so I wake in the morning
And I step outside
And I take a deep breath and I get real high
And I scream from the top of my lungs
What’s going on?
And I say, hey yeah yeah, hey yeah yeah
I said hey, what’s going on?
And I say, hey yeah yeah, hey yeah yeah
I said hey, what’s going on?
oh, oh oh
oh, oh oh
And I try, oh my god do I try
I try all the time, in this institution
And I pray, oh my god do I pray
I pray every single day
For a revolution.
And so I cry sometimes
When I’m lying bed
Just to get it all out
What’s in my head
And I, I am feeling a little peculiar
And so I wake in the morning
And I step outside
And I take a deep breath and I get real high
And I scream from the top of my lungs
What’s going on?
And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?
And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?
And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?
And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?
oh, oh oh oh
Twenty-five years and my life is still
Trying to get that great big hill of hope
For a destination

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Leonel Vásquez

Arquitecto croata diseña un órgano que convierte las olas del mar en música

Autor: Jose M. Taboada
Vía TysMagazine | Noviembre 20, 2015

 

El arquitecto croata Nikola Bašić creó un impresionante órgano marino que traduce las olas del mar en una relajante música.

‘Morse Orgulje’, lo que se puede traducir como ‘órgano majestuoso’, fue diseñado  por este arquitecto en 2005. Es la estrella indiscutible de la ciudad de Zadar en Croacia. Un espectáculo increíble. Los canales de este órgano conectan 35 tubos, cada uno conectado a su vez a diferentes cadenas musicales. Así obtiene de forma natural los sonidos. Las notas que desprende son puramente aleatorias, dependen de como las olas imparten contra el órgano.

Con este diseño, el arquitecto croata ganó el premio ex aequo de la cuarta edición del Premio Europeo del Espacio Público Urbano.

Inspirado en un pequeño instrumento griego de nombre hydraulis, y con el antecedente de la creación del Wave Organ en la ciudad de San Francisco en 1986, este órgano de mar posee 70 metros de largo,  fabricado en su totalidad de hormigón y con unos escalones en mármol.

Sus 35 tubos generan de forma precisa una nota distinta provocada con el movimiento de las olas y la energía del viento. Cada tubo atraviesa la estructura y hace contacto con el mar Adriático, mientras que en la parte de arriba veremos pequeños orificios, que en conjunto crean una melodía sorprendente e ideal para perder la vista en el horizonte, o simplemente un placer para nuestros sentidos.

Aquí puedes ver y oir este impresionante instrumento-escultura:

y sí sólo quieres oír su sonido…

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


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Leonel Vásquez

SONIDOS DE LA TIERRA / SOUNDS OF THE EARTH con Eva Julian

SONIDOS DE LA TIERRA / SOUNDS OF THE EARTH con Eva Julian

Autora: Alícia Ninou
Vía YouTube | Diciembre 27, 2014

Entrevista recomendada por Andrea López Tyrer, colaboradora de Chile/España para Replicación de Arttextum

Entrevista de Alicia Ninou a Eva Julián, música, compositora y sonidista especializada en Bioacústica y en la aplicación terapéutica de sonido natural. Desde 1985 investiga sobre la incidencia del sonido en los seres vivos, realizando grabaciones por variados lugares naturales del planeta, diseña y personaliza ambientes sonoros terapéuticos para hospitales, centros médicos especializados, para personas en procesos vitales y para colectivos con necesidades especificas.

Sonidoyvida es el resultado de más de 27 años de investigación en bioacústica y en la comprobación de las propiedades terapéuticas y sagradas que poseen los sonidos que emite la tierra y todos los seres de la naturaleza. Eva Julián ha observado que estos sonidos son capaces de mantener el equilibrio vital de los seres vivos y reconducirlos a un estado de conciencia en armonía con la tierra y con el cosmos.

Eva Julián
http://www.soundandlife.com

Un reportaje de Alicia Ninou
http://www.TimeForTruth.es

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LANTERNA, Faro di Genova dal 1128

LANTERNA, Faro di Genova dal 1128

Autore: Associazione AMICI DELLA LANTERNA
Via lanternadigenova.it

Articolo raccomandato da Javier Armas Cortez, collaboratore di Messico per Replicación di Arttextum

 

La Lanterna di Genova
Simbolo della città di Genova, sita sul promontorio di Capo di Faro la Lanterna, con i suoi 77 metri di altezza, è il faro più alto del Mediterraneo, secondo in Europa. L’attuale costruzione risale al 1543, ma fin dal XII secolo esisteva una torre di struttura simile, nata come torre di guardia per annunciare l’arrivo di imbarcazioni sospette e divenuta nel tempo anche faro, sulla cui sommità si bruciavano fascine per segnalare ai naviganti l’accesso al porto. Nel 1326 vi si installò la prima lanterna ad olio di oliva, la cui luce era concentrata in un fascio grazie a cristalli trasparenti prodotti da maestri vetrai liguri e veneziani. La rappresentazione probabilmente più antica di questa prima Lanterna risale al 1371 e compare sulla copertina di un registro dell’autorità marittima del tempo. Nel Quattrocento la torre fu adibita a prigione e custodì, tra gli altri, il re di Cipro. Agli inizi del Cinquecento fu edificata la fortezza della Briglia, voluta da Luigi XII per le truppe che presidiavano la città: i genovesi, insorti contro i francesi, la bombardarono, danneggiando anche la Lanterna, ridotta a “mezza torre”. Nel 1543 essa venne ricostruita e le antiche merlature furono sostituite. Da allora la Lanterna superò senza gravi conseguenze il bombardamento navale del Re Sole alla fine del Seicento, i combattimenti del 1746 dopo la rivolta di Portoria, i bombardamenti della seconda guerra mondiale, nonché innumerevoli momenti di intemperie naturali (fino a quando, nel 1778, non fu dotata di impianto parafulmine). In tempi più recenti la potenza del faro aumentò notevolmente, sia per l’introduzione di più moderni sistemi ottici (data 1840 il sistema rotante con lenti di Fresnel), sia per l’introduzione di nuovi combustibili: il gas di acetilene (1898), poi il petrolio pressurizzato (1905), fino all’elettrificazione del 1936.

La Storia della torre dal 1128 ad oggi
Secondo alcune fonti non ufficiali, nel 1128 venne edificata la prima torre, alta poco meno dell’esistente, con una struttura architettonica simile all’attuale, ma con tre tronchi merlati sovrapposti. Alla sua sommità venivano accesi, allo scopo di segnalare le navi in avvicinamento, fasci di steli secchi di erica (“brugo”) o di ginestra (“brusca”). I documenti del secolo XI, le prime cronache e gli atti ufficiali del nascente comune genovese forniscono dati sicuri sulla torre di segnalazione, ma non la sua data esatta di costruzione. Nel 1318, durante la guerra tra Guelfi e Ghibellini la torre subì rilevanti danni alle fondamenta ad opera della fazione ghibellina; nel 1321 vennero effettuati lavori di consolidamento e venne scavato un fossato allo scopo di renderla meglio difendibile. La prima lanterna venne installata nel 1326; la lucerna era alimentata ad olio di oliva ed in merito l’annalista Giorgio Stella scriveva: “In quest’anno fu fatta una grande lanterna sulla torre di Capo Faro affinché con le lampade in essa accese, nelle notti oscure, i naviganti conoscessero l’adito alla nostra città”. Al meglio identificare la lanterna con la città, nel 1340 venne dipinto alla sommità della torre inferiore lo stemma del comune di Genova opera del pittore Evangelista di Milano.La più antica rappresentazione iconografica della prima torre della lanterna è del 1371 ed appare in un disegno a penna sopra una copertina pergamenacea di un manuale dei “Salvatori del Porto”, dove venivano fra l’altro registrate tutte le spese per la illuminazione, per i cristalli della lanterna, per le lampade, per l’olio, e le nomine dei guardiani.Nell’assedio alla Briglia – forte fatto costruire dal re Luigi XII durante la dominazione francese su Genova, ubicato sullo stesso colle dove sorgeva la torre del faro – la torre venne centrata dai colpi di bombarda sparati dagli insorti genovesi e parzialmente demolita. Per trenta anni la bella torre rimase monca e la sua brillante luce non fu più di aiuto ai naviganti.Solo nel 1543 venne ricostruita e fu posta in opera alla sua sommità una nuova lanterna costruita con doghe di legno di rovere e ricoperta con fogli di rame e di piombo fermati con ben seicento chiodi di rame. Fu quella occasione che la torre assunse il suo aspetto definitivo che ancora oggi vediamo. Nel 1565 si ritornò a lavorare sulla cupola per renderla stagna e nel 1681 si ricostruì la cupola con legno di castagno selvatico calafatando il tutto con pesce e stoppa e ricoprendola con fogli di piombo stagnati ai bordi sovrapposti. Nel 1684 durante i bombardamento di Genova ordinato dall’Ammiraglio francese Seignelai per ordine di re Luigi XIV, un colpo centrò la cupola distruggendone l’intera vetrata, che venne provvisoriamente ricostruita; nel 1692, la vetrata venne modifica aggiungendovi un nuovo ordine di vetri. Nel Portolano manoscritto del XVI secolo di autore anonimo si legge “a miglia 14 da Peggi (Genova Pegli) città con buonissimo porto e alla parte di ponente, vi è una lanterna altissima e dà segni alli vascelli che vengono a piè di detta lanterna”. A seguito dei ripetuti danni causati dai fulmini e dagli avvenimenti bellici nel 1771 la torre venne incatenata a mezzo di chiavarde e di tiranti che ancora oggi sono visibili all’interno. Nel 1778 venne dotata di impianto parafulmine che fu realizzato dal fisico P.G.Sanxais e nel 1791 vennero effettuati alla base della prima torre, lavori di consolidamento per renderla più stabile.

Le immagini di: lanternadigenova

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NOWNESS: A global video channel screening the best in culture

NOWNESS: A global video channel screening the best in culture

Author: NOWNESS
Via nowness.com 

Article recommended by Mariana Chávez Berrón from the Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

 

NOWNESS is a movement for creative excellence in storytelling celebrating the extraordinary of every day.  Launched in 2010, NOWNESS’ unique programming strategy has established it as the go to source of inspiration and influence across art, design, fashion, beauty, music, food, and travel. Our curatorial expertise and award-winning approach to storytelling is unparalleled. We work with exceptional talent, and both established and emerging filmmakers which connect our audience to emotional and sensorial stories designed to provoke inspiration and debate.

NOWNESS launched a Chinese-language site in 2012 and since 2013 videos are available in up to 10 languages including English, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish and Russian (just turn on Subtitles on our player).

Image: Miguel C Tavares’s film Become Ocean.

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Maps that show us who we are (not just where we are) | Danny Dorling

Author: Danny Dorling
Via YouTube | December 21, 2016

 

The vastness of space is almost too mind-boggling for the human brain to comprehend. In order to accurately illustrate our place in the universe, one group of friends decided to build the first scale model of the solar system in seven miles of empty desert. Watch a beautiful representation of our universe come together in light and space in this extraordinary short film.

What does the world look like when you map it using data? Social geographer Danny Dorling invites us to see the world anew, with his captivating and insightful maps that show Earth as it truly is — a connected, ever-changing and fascinating place in which we all belong. You’ll never look at a map the same way again.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.

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Image: Benjamin Henning

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Artistic Topography
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Artist Uses Kintsugi to Mend Cracked Streets with Gold

Artist Uses Kintsugi to Mend Cracked Streets with Gold

Author: Jessica Stewart
Via My Modern Met | February 24, 2017

Article recommended by Mick Lorusso from the USA / Italy, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

 

Contemporary artist Rachel Sussman is mending cracks in our urban environment with her series Sidewalk Kintsukuroi. Inspired by kintsugi—also known as kintsukuroi—the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with gold, Sussman brings this philosophy to city pavements.

Sussman was already attracted to the Japanese aesthetic philosophy of wabi-sabi when an image of repaired broken pottery sparked her imagination. As chance would have it, she discovered the photograph of kintsugi around the time when her book The Oldest Living Things in the World was being published.

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #01 (New Haven, Connecticut),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust
“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #01 (New Haven, Connecticut),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust

After spending 10 years photographing ancient organisms for that project, it was a natural next step to play with the idea of repairing what is broken. A new installation and studies from Sidewalk Kintsukuroi are currently part of the Alchemy: Transformations in Gold exhibition at the Des Moines Art Center.

Sussman repaired a crack in the center’s marble floor, an installation which is now part of the museum’s permanent collection. Also on display are study photographs, where the streets of New York City have their fissures filled with gold dust.

Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #02 (MASS MoCA),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust
Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #02 (MASS MoCA),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust

Whether permanent or theoretical, Sussman’s work falls in line with kintsugi philosophy.  “Cracks represent something in need of attention, and the surfaces we walk, bike, and drive over are usually overlooked until they’re in truly critical condition,” the artist explains. “By gilding them, it’s a way to see what’s around us with fresh eyes and to celebrate perseverance.”

All images: Rachel Sussman.

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Un libro de colorear que homenajea la belleza natural de la proporción áurea

Un libro de colorear que homenajea la belleza natural de la proporción áurea

Autor: mymodernmet
Vía Cultura Inquieta | Abril 23, 2016

Artículo recomendado por Karla Castillo, colaboradora de México para Replicación de Arttextum

 

Las ilustraciones de Proporción Áurea dibujadas a mano por Rafael Araujo son una hermosa fusión del arte con la ciencia. Durante los últimos 40 años, el arquitecto e ilustrador venezolano ha estado perfeccionando sus sorprendentes dibujos, todos conectados por ese hilo conductor.

Armado de lápiz, compás, regla, transportador de ángulos y nada más, crea dibujos que representan la brillantez matemática del mundo natural y recientemente ha comenzado a recopilar versiones de sus mejores trabajos en un libro de colorear para adultos que busca el reencuentro de los seres humanos con la naturaleza.

Las ilustraciones de Araujo giran en torno a los inteligentes patrones de crecimiento gobernados por la Proporción Áurea. Este número especial, comúnmente anotado con la letra griega Phi (φ), es igual a 1,618 y se puede observar en todo tipo de espirales naturales, secuencias y proporciones.

“Phyllotaxis” es como se denomina  la tendencia de las cosas orgánicas a crecer en patrones en espiral y este patrón numérico se repite tan a menudo en la naturaleza que algunos investigadores lo han considerado una norma universal de perfección de estructuras, formas y proporciones.

Desde conchas de mar, hojas, cristales, e incluso alas de mariposa, podemos rastrear el número Phi a lo largo de nuestro entorno, una y otra vez.

Aplicar la Proporción Áurea a sus dibujos y dejar las líneas de construcción en las imágenes finales, permite a Araujo crear diseños que claramente gravitan alrededor de este marco matemático. Cada composición es cuidadosamente detallada y puede llevar hasta 100 horas al artista completar una sola de ellas.

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


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¿Se puede aprender a ser artista?

¿Se puede aprender a ser artista?

Autor: 
Vía Jotdown | Marzo 2017

Artículo recomendado por Cindy Elizondo, colaboradora de Costa Rica para Replicación de Arttextum

Tenemos una imagen del artista. Y es una imagen de la que es difícil escapar, muy formada, fija, casi cincelada en mármol: el artista es una persona solitaria y ensimismada en su investigación y su trabajo. Una persona con un talento especial, un don recibido por los hados o las musas y que manifiesta desde la infancia más temprana. Alguien destinado, predestinado al arte.

¿Pues saben una cosa? Esa imagen es más falsa que un Velázquez comprado en el Retiro. Sí, es cierto que un creador puede tener aptitudes más o menos naturales. Una sensibilidad más enfocada o una predisposición a observar e interpretar el mundo, pero lo más probable es que no tenga nada que ver con infusiones divinas, sino con la educación, lo familiar o lo ambiental. Incluso algo tan intangible, tan aparentemente hermético como el genio, también se puede aprender. Y enseñar.

El propio Diego Velázquez no emergió de una marmita de gracia artística. Su talento ya se apreciaba en la infancia, sí, pero nunca como un encapsulado prodigio. A Velázquez le enseñaron. Le enseñaron el «arte bien y cumplidamente según como vos lo sabéis sin encubrir de él cosa alguna.» Así rezaba parte del contrato que su padre, Juan Rodríguez de Silva, firmó con el pintor sevillano Francisco Pacheco. Diego tenía once años y aprendió, ya lo creo que aprendió. Aprendió a moler los colores, a decantar los barnices y a tensar los lienzos. Y aprendió a dibujar, porque Pacheco, que más tarde se convertiría en su suegro, no era un gran pintor pero era un excelente dibujante a lápiz y a carbón. Velázquez aprendió a delimitar contornos, a usar las sombras y a generar expresiones. En cien estudios y retratos, Diego aprendió todo lo que pudo, todo lo que Pacheco sabía sin ocultarle ninguna cosa. Y cuando ya no tuvo más que aprender, aprendió a buscar su propio camino. Aprendió a ir más allá. Aprendió a pintar lo que no existía en el lienzo ni en la figura. Lo que había en el medio. Aprendió a pintar el aire.

Sueño de San José, Francisco Pacheco, 1617 y Adoración de los Magos, Diego Velázquez, 1619.
Sueño de San José, Francisco Pacheco, 1617 y Adoración de los Magos, Diego Velázquez, 1619.

La arquitectura es la disciplina artística menos artística de todas, sobre todo desde la eclosión del Movimiento Moderno a principios del siglo XX. La arquitectura siempre responde a un programa y a una función porque siempre debe cumplir la función y el programa para los que ha sido concebida. Y además debe ser sólida, consistente y resistente; literalmente, no como característica conceptual. Los edificios tienen que mantenerse en pie. La arquitectura es el arte más profesional de todos porque debe cumplir la utilitas y la firmitas vitruvianas. Pero, ¿y la venustas? ¿Y la belleza? ¿Se puede enseñar la belleza arquitectónica?

Eduardo Souto de Moura nació en Oporto en 1959. Su padre, José Alberto, era cirujano oftalmólogo y de él aprendió la exactitud y la precisión. De su madre, Maria Teresa Ramos, aprendió la dedicación y el trabajo constante. Maria Teresa era ama de casa. Souto de Moura estudió en la Escola Superior de Belas Artes de Porto antes de que se convirtiese en Facultad de Arquitectura. La arquitectura era una de las bellas artes y allí aprendió a que sus edificios fuesen útiles, fuesen firmes y también a que fuesen bellos. Aunque aún no tenía del todo claro dónde estaba la belleza en la arquitectura. Aún sin terminar la carrera, trabajó durante cinco años en el estudio de Álvaro Siza Vieira, el gran maestro de la arquitectura portuguesa. De Siza aprendió el respeto por el contexto, por el lugar y por el tiempo. Aprendió que los edificios pertenecían a una tradición material e incluso simbólica, a veces transnacional y a veces vernácula. Allí comprendió que la belleza de la arquitectura no se podía aislar, sino que se conformaba por un agregado poliédrico de múltiples características interconectadas e interrelacionadas. Que todo contribuía a generarla. La belleza era imposible sin exactitud y precisión, sin dedicación y trabajo continuo, sin utilidad y resistencia, sin comprensión del tiempo, el lugar y el mundo. Quizá nunca supere a su maestro, pero de él también aprendió a volar libre, porque fue el propio Siza quien insistió una y otra vez en que abriese su propio despacho. Y así lo hizo en 1980, al poco de licenciarse. Eduardo Souto de Moura fue galardonado con el Premio Pritzker en 2011. Álvaro Siza lo había recibido en 1992.

A veces, el aprendizaje no es vernáculo sino exterior. Y eso pasa en cualquier disciplina, también en el arte.

Cristina Iglesias comenzó la carrera de Ciencias Químicas pero la abandonó enseguida para estudiar arte. Seguramente algo tendría que ver con la pequeña nube noosférica que sobrevolaba su familia y que hizo que todos los hermanos —los cinco— acabasen dedicados a profesiones creativas: desde el compositor Alberto hasta la escritora y guionista Lourdes. Cuando ya había cumplido veinte años, Cristina abandonó su Donostia natal para aprender dibujo y cerámica en Barcelona. Allí descubrió la escultura y el barro: «Me interesaba ese material moldeable al que podía añadir color.» Pero Iglesias quería buscar nuevos lenguajes que no podía encontrar en Barcelona. Así que, en 1980, se marchó a Londres, a la Chelsea School of Art. En la capital británica todo era distinto, era más abierto, menos atado al clasicismo o al academicismo. Surgía la new british sculpture y surgían figuras como Tony Cragg, Richard Wentworth o Anish Kapoor.

Cloud Gate de Anish Kapoor, instalada en Chicago en 2004 y las puertas de la ampliación Museo del Prado de Madrid, obra de Cristina Iglesias de 2007. Fotografías: Steve Wright Jr. y Jacinta Lluch Valero (CC)
Cloud Gate de Anish Kapoor, instalada en Chicago en 2004 y las puertas de la ampliación Museo del Prado de Madrid, obra de Cristina Iglesias de 2007. Fotografías: Steve Wright Jr. y Jacinta Lluch Valero (CC)

Cristina Iglesias aprendió de todos ellos. De Kragg aprendió la articulación sinuosa, de Wentworth aprendió la yuxtaposición de materiales y elementos que no suelen estar juntos, de Kapoor aprendió la distorsionada reflexión de la luz. Y no les hizo caso a ninguno de ellos. Por eso, cuando recibió el Premio Nacional de Artes Plásticas en 1999, nadie pudo encontrar influencias directas en sus superficies rugosas y matéricas o en sus intrincadas celosías. Porque Iglesias siempre quiso trabajar en el lateral de la corriente. Y quizá fue ese su mayor aprendizaje: que la verdadera enseñanza reside en el pensamiento, no en la imitación.

Y también hay casos en los que no se aprende de maestros y ni siquiera de colegas de disciplina; se aprende de coetáneos y de amigos. Se aprende de un ambiente generacional. Y todos aprenden de todos.

Cuando llegó a Madrid a los dieciocho años, Pedro Almodóvar no llevaba una maleta de cartón, sino el maletín de maquillaje de Patty Diphusa. En La Mancha de su infancia había aprendido que no quería saber nada de La Mancha ni de su infancia, que no quería saber nada del mundo en el que había crecido. Quería un mundo distinto y quería contarlo en una pantalla y, aunque no pudo matricularse en la escuela de cine, le dio igual porque aprendería de todo lo demás. Y todo lo demás era, literalmente, todo. Almodóvar aprendió del aire nuevo y de las calles nuevas. Aprendió del porno, de la cultura y de la contracultura. De El Víbora y de Diario 16. Aprendió de Félix Rotaeta y de Carmen Maura y de Ana Curra y de Alaska y de Carlos Berlanga y de Fabio McNamara y de Alberto García-Alix. Todos amigos y todos coetáneos. Todos movidos en la Movida. Y todos aprendieron de él. Todos aprendieron a mearse delante de la cámara, a estar al borde de un ataque de nervios, a disfrutar de las grandes gangas y a mirarse el lado femenino.

Y todos se enseñaron y todos aprendieron a crecer y a entender el pasado. A entender que Madrid les pertenecía como les pertenecía México, León, El Escorial o Calzada de Calatrava. Y Almodóvar siguió aprendiendo, entre Óscars, Goyas, Césars, BAFTAs y Davides de Donatello. Entre el Premio Nacional de Cinematografía y el Premio Príncipe de Asturias aprendió incluso a Volver. También aprendió de Russ Meyer, de John Waters o de David Lynch, como lo había hecho de Fernando Colomo y de Alfonso Marsillach. Y ellos aprendieron de Almodóvar. Hasta ahora y desde el principio.

Desde el principio enseñan en la Escuela de Profesiones Artísticas SUR fundada por el Círculo de Bellas Artes y La Fábrica. Enseñan a aprender. Y a aprenderlo todo de todos. Allí no estará Velázquez, pero sí estará Souto de Moura, Iglesias, Almodóvar y García-Alix. Como estará Luis de Pablo, Oscar Mariné o Eduardo Arroyo. Y también estarán alumnos de todas las edades y procedencias de los que aprender y a los que enseñar. Aprender y enseñar a mezclar colores, a absorber influencias de todos lados, a contemplar el contexto y el tiempo y el lugar, a mirar y a volver o a pensar sin imitar. En definitiva, a querer ser artista. A querer al arte.

Sí, quizá para ser artista solo necesitamos proponérnoslo. Y dejar que nos enseñen.

Imagen de portada: Ana María González, Medellín, Colombia, veintitrés años. Artista plástica. Alumna de SUR. Foto: Luis de las Alas

Creemos en tu trabajo y opinión, por eso lo difundimos con créditos; si no estás de acuerdo, por favor contáctanos.


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Every Noise at Once

Author: Glenn McDonald – The Echo Nest
Via Every Noise at Once

 

Sound, maps & algorithms!

This is an ongoing attempt at an algorithmically-generated, readability-adjusted scatter-plot of the musical genre-space, based on data tracked and analyzed for 1387 genres by The Echo Nest. The calibration is fuzzy, but in general down is more organic, up is more mechanical and electric; left is denser and more atmospheric, right is spikier and bouncier.

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Four Charles Bukowski Poems Animated

Four Charles Bukowski Poems Animated

Author: 
Via Open Culture | May 5, 2014

Article and videos recommended by Karla Castillo from Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

The poetry of Charles Bukowski deeply inspires many of its readers. Sometimes it just inspires them to lead the dissolute lifestyle they think they see glorified in it, but other times it leads them to create something compelling of their own. The quality and variety of the Bukowski-inspired animation now available on the internet, for instance, has certainly surprised me.

At the top of the post, we have Jonathan Hodgson’s adaptation of “The Man with the Beautiful Eyes,” which puts vivid, colorful imagery to Bukowski’s late poem that draws from his childhood memories of a mysterious, untamed young man in a run-down house whose very existence reminded him “that nobody wanted anybody to be strong and beautiful like that, that others would never allow it.” Below, you can watch Monika Umba’s even more unconventional animation of “Bluebird“:

Without any words spoken on the soundtrack and only the title seen onscreen — a challenging creative restriction for a poetry-based short — Umba depicts the narrator’s “bluebird in my heart that wants to get out.” But the narrator, “too tough for him,” beats back the bluebird’s escape with whiskey, cigarettes, and a policy of only letting him roam “at night sometimes, when everybody’s asleep.”

You’ll find Bradley Bell’s interpretation of “The Laughing Heart,” a poem that advises its readers not to let their lives “be clubbed into dank submission,” to “be on the watch,” for “there are ways out.” “You can’t beat death,” Bukowski writes, “but you can beat death in life, sometimes.” In Bell’s short, these words come from the mouth of the also famously dissolution-chronicling singer-songwriter Tom Waits, certainly Bukowski’s most suitable living reader (and one who, all told, comes second only to the man himself). Only fitting that one inspiring creator delivers the work of another — in the sort of labor of enthusiasm that, too, will inspire its audience to create.

At the bottom the post, you will find “Roll the Dice,” an animation suggested by one of our readers, Mark.

You can find readings of Bukowski poems in the poetry section of our collection of Free Audio Books.

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One of the World’s Only Globe-Making Studios Celebrates the Ancient Art of Handcrafter Globes

Author: Jenny Zhang
Via My Modern Met | August 20, 2015

 

A globe is the only “true” representation of the world that doesn’t distort the shape or the size of the earth’s features. Terrestrial (showing a map of the world) and celestial (showing the apparent positions of the stars in the sky) globes are known to have been made since the mid-2nd century B.C., but the earliest surviving terrestrial globe was made in 1492 by Martin Behaim, a German mapmaker, navigator, and merchant. Globe making developed rapidly during the Renaissance as a result of technological developments like the mechanical printing press, as well as the increasing availability of Latin translations of Ptolemy’s treatise Geographica. By the end of the 15th century, globe making had become a well-established craft in Europe, further motivating voyagers such as Christopher Columbus to go forth and explore new lands.

In the modern age, with the advent of GPS in addition to the abundance of mass-produced globes and maps, the art of globe making has fallen by the wayside. Only two workshops in the world still make handcrafted globes; one of them is Bellerby & Co. Globemakers, a studio based in Stoke Newington, London. Founded by Peter Bellerby in 2008, the artisan shop was born when Bellerby struggled to find a quality globe for his father’s 80th birthday present. Faced with a choice between a cheaply made modern globe or a fragile, expensive antique model, Bellerby decided to spend a few months and a few thousand pounds making his own, instead. The process turned out to be more complicated, costly, and time-intensive than he thought, eventually leading to the creation of his own globe-making studio.

Now, Bellerby and a small team of dedicated globemakers construct high-quality, handmade, artisan globes that are as much works of art as they are scientific instruments. From the stand, to the painting, to the mapmaking, each piece is expertly crafted in-house using traditional and modern globe-making techniques. Globe making is a difficult art to learn, with the act of applying the strips of map to the sphere (known as “goring”) alone usually taking a year to master, but the stunning results speak for themselves. In a day and age when digital reigns supreme and cheap products fall apart quickly, Bellerby & Co.’s classically beautiful, handcrafted globes are a testament to the wonderful quality and aesthetic of goods made by true artisans.

Bellerby & Co. has gained international acclaim for its globes, which range in size from mini 23-cm desk versions to massive 127-cm spheres. The globes have been used for BBC productions, in Hollywood films like Martin Scorsese’s Hugo, and by artists in installations. Other customers have commissioned customized globes that highlight their favorite places, fanciful illustrations, or the locations they wish to visit someday. Timeless in appearance and built to last over a century, Bellerby & Co.’s globes memorialize the ancient art of globe making while looking forward to a future of possibilities in craftsmanship, science, and art.

Images: Bellerby & Co. Globemakers

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Unseen Cuba: First aerial photographs reveal island’s spectacular beauty

Author: David Sim
Via International Business Times | May 18, 2015

 

Here’s Cuba as you’ve never seen it before. Lithuanian aerial photographer and publisher Marius Jovaiša is the first artist to receive government permission to fly over the country and photograph it from above.

“Nobody had been able to take aerial pictures of the country because of the secretive political regime and technical difficulties,” he told IBTimes UK. “I thought it would be awesome to try to become the first man on the planet who could convince the Cuban government to give permission for such an endeavour.”

“That was the beginning of a long story,” he continued. “I spent two years in the paperwork and bureaucracy stage. There were so many crazy requirements, unpleasant surprises, changes of circumstances, rules etc that I could write a separate book about it. I guess the Cuban military live by the rules written in the 1960s. Even though now you can go to Google Earth and see every square metre of Cuba, the military still tightly controls the airspace and its secrets.”

Jovaiša says on most aerial photography projects he would simply rent a helicopter, but the rental service in Havana had only a huge Russian-made MI-8 helicopter that wasn’t viable. He bought a custom-built ultralight trike and had it shipped over from Australia.

He says the Unseen Cuba project took five years and a million dollars to come to fruition. But the results are spectacular. Turquoise seas, white sands, ancient villages, dramatic mountains and cities frozen in time.

In this gallery, we publish a selection of his beautiful photographs. See the Unseen Cuba website to learn more about the project and buy a copy of the book, featuring 400 aerial photos of the Caribbean island. There is also an app for Android and Apple phones and tablets, with additional interactive content.

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SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe: Modern Ruins 1:220

Iván Puig, artista Arttextum

Author: The Arts Catalyst
Via SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe: Modern Ruins 1:220 | June 21, 2014

 

Artists Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene (Los Ferronautas) built their striking silver road-rail SEFT-1 vehicle to explore the abandoned passenger railways of Mexico and Ecuador, capturing their journeys in videos, photographs and collected objects.

In their first London exhibition, SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe: Modern Ruins 1: 200, commissioned by The Arts Catalyst and presented in partnership with Furtherfield Gallery, in the heart of Finsbury Park, the artists explore how the ideology of progress is imprinted onto historic landscapes and reflect on the two poles of the social experience of technology – use and obsolescence.

Between 2010 and 2011, the artists travelled across Mexico and Ecuador in the SEFT-1 (Sonda de Exploración Ferroviaria Tripulada or Manned Railway Exploration Probe). In a transdisciplinary art project, they set out to explore disused railways as a starting point for reflection and research, recording the landscapes and infrastructure around and between cities. Interviewing people they met, often from communities isolated by Mexico’s passenger railway closures, they shared their findings online, seft1.com, where audiences could track the probe’s trajectory, view maps and images and listen to interviews.

The artists’ journeys led them to the notion of modern ruins: places and systems left behind quite recently, not because they weren’t functional, but for a range of political and economical reasons. In the second half of the 19th century, the Mexican government partnered with British companies to built the railway line that would connect Mexico City with the Atlantic Ocean – and beyond to Europe. This iconic railway infrastructure now lies in ruins, much of it abandoned due to the privatization of the railway system in 1995, when many passenger trains were withdrawn, lines cut off and communities isolated.

For this new exhibition, the artists are inviting British expert model railway constructors to collaborate by creating scale reproductions of specific Mexican railway ruins exactly as they are now. One gallery becomes a space for the process of model ruin construction. The room’s walls will show the pictures, documents, plans and other materials used as reference for the meticulously elaborated ruin construction. With this action a dystopian time tunnel is created.

The exhibition was held at the Furtherfield Gallery, Finsbury Park, London N4 2NQ, UK, 21 June to 27 July 2014.

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Musical instrument uses 2,000 marbles to play incredible music

Author: Wintergatan
Via Wintergatan

 

Music, Machines and Homemade Music Instruments!

Wintergatan is a Swedish Instrumental band and are currently building a new Marble Machine to go on a world tour with once functional.

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The Woman Who Has Transformed English National Ballet

The Woman Who Has Transformed English National Ballet

Author: Roslyn Sulcas
Via The New York Times | November 18, 2016

Article recommended by Karla Castillo from Mexico, collaborator of Arttextum’s Replicación

 

LONDON — Artistic director, star ballerina, lobbyist, wrangler, psychologist, spokeswoman. Tamara Rojo, the artistic director of English National Ballet, is one busy woman.

Ms. Rojo, 42, a Spanish-born former Royal Ballet principal dancer, has been in her current job for four years, and she has made a startling difference to English National Ballet — a London touring company of 67 dancers that has no home theater and has struggled for a long time to establish its identity in the shadow of the Royal. On Tuesday, her company began a sold-out run of Akram Khan’s critically praised “Giselle” at Sadler’s Wells. Ms. Rojo commissioned the piece last year, part of her risk-taking approach.

She is also the company’s marquee ballerina (along with a fellow Royal Ballet alum, Alina Cojocaru), somehow managing to keep up her technical form and artistry while acting as a one-woman visionary, manager, cheerleader and glamorous high-profile ad for her organization.

Does she sleep? “As a dancer, you learn focus,” Ms. Rojo said.

Looking pale and slightly drawn, Ms. Rojo, even so, appeared full of energy in an interview earlier this month at the company’s headquarters near Royal Albert Hall. Every day, she said, involves a juggling act between dancing and directorial duties, with her attention constantly pulled among the needs of her dancers, administrative meetings and performing.

There are few female ballet company directors, but Ms. Rojo knew it was a job she wanted. “You can have a much wider impact on society as a director, than a dancer,” she said. “I think ballet can be so much more ambitious, do so much more, than it does now.” Since succeeding Wayne Eagling in 2012, she has worked that ambition, commissioning works from three relatively unknown female choreographers, and a war-themed program from Mr. Khan, Liam Scarlett and Russell Maliphant. She has also programmed challenging works by William Forsythe and Pina Bausch.

And last year, she formed an association with Sadler’s Wells that has given English National Ballet a London base to showcase its contemporary work. That is “the kind of risk-taking that a touring ballet company can’t otherwise do in this climate,” Debra Craine, the chief dance critic for The London Times, said in an email, referring to Britain’s recent cuts in arts financing.

Ms. Rojo has a narrow path to walk between popular appeal and artistic innovation. English National Ballet (called London Festival Ballet until 1989) was founded in 1950 by the British ballet stars Alicia Markova and Anton Dolin with the aim of taking ballet to the provinces. The troupe still has a touring obligation, and with subsidies at a much lower level than those of Royal Ballet, it depends on box-office certainties like “Swan Lake,” “Sleeping Beauty” and an annual “Nutcracker.” (The company’s annual budget is about $19 million, with $7.5 million coming from Arts Council England, a government body.)

“I’ve seen so many directors come through E.N.B. over the years — some of them with visionary ideas,” Judith Mackrell, a dance critic for The Guardian, said in an email. “All were defeated by cautiousness of the board and by the company’s remit from Arts Council England to deliver ballet to the regions.”

Ms. Rojo, who danced with English National Ballet for three years before joining Royal Ballet in 2000, doesn’t mean to lose. “I actually saw advantages in most of the things people thought of as problems,” she said. “Touring means you can really build young artists by giving them proper time onstage. And the beauty of rivaling the Royal is that we can really create an identity of our own. How should we look at the classical repertory and perform it today?”

Ballet has been her passion since she was 5, Ms. Rojo said, when she first glimpsed a class (“it was a revelation”) after school in Madrid, where she grew up. Her parents were not well off and made sacrifices to send her to an excellent ballet school, run by Victor Ullate, whose company she joined at 16. After winning the Paris International Dance Competition in 1994, she left Madrid to join Scottish National Ballet, where she spent just six months before being approached by Derek Deane, then the director of English National Ballet.

She didn’t think about directing a company, she said, until Spain’s government approached her in 2006, when she was with Royal Ballet. “The president wanted something like an English National Ballet for Spain, a touring company, and he wanted to know what it would cost, what infrastructure would it need, would I take on?” Ms. Rojo said. “I felt it was too early for me, but I began to do the research, and I realized that I wanted to know as much as possible about how to run a company.” (The Spanish government did not go ahead with the project.)

Ms. Rojo later participated in training for future artistic directors, shadowing Karen Kain at the National Ballet of Canada. When the Royal Ballet directorship opened in 2011, she was a front-runner, although the job ultimately went to Kevin O’Hare. Ms. Rojo said she was relieved. “A few years later, this position became available,” she said, “and I knew what I could achieve here.”

Ms. Rojo is a leader, said Alistair Spalding, the artistic director of Sadler’s Wells. “She is out there, looking for ideas, making things happen, looking for connections, a brilliant networker,” he said. “Despite the financial restrictions, she has been able to be more fleet of foot than she would have been at the Royal. The challenges for her are to raise enough money, and keep audience numbers up.”

Ms. Rojo’s big challenge will be raising money for the company’s planned 2018 move from its current cramped location to new headquarters it will share with English National Ballet School in Canning Town, East London. It will cost about $30 million, she said. As well as doubling studio capacity, the new building will have a production studio with a stage and full lighting and sound capability. (The stage is big enough for run-throughs, but the theater has a capacity of just 170.)

“Today, a ballet company will invest on average 1.8 million pounds” — $2.25 million — “on a new production, then give themselves two days onstage because it’s just too expensive,” Ms. Rojo said. “Compare that, again, with theater and its weeks of previews. But it’s the same audience. Right now, we are asking them to somehow bear with us, and I don’t want that. I want you to be moved and impressed and intrigued and overwhelmed. I want audiences to have the highest expectations.”

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El impacto medioambiental de Google

Joana Moll, artista Arttextum

Autores: Roberta Bosco y Stefano Caldana
Vía Fundación Aquae | Octubre 6, 2015

 

Sin tomar en consideración la actividad de las industrias, está comprobado que el tráfico aéreo genera menos contaminación que los tradicionales medios de transporte, pero ¿puede ser superado por las emisiones generadas por la actividad de los usuarios de la red?

La asombrosa respuesta es sí. Lo demuestra la artista catalana Joana Moll (Barcelona, 1982) con su CO2GLE, un proyecto artístico que revela un dato sorprendente: navegar en la red contamina más que volar con un avión. De hecho, sólo la lectura de este artículo supone una emisión en la atmósfera de aproximadamente 0.17 gramos de dióxido de carbono (CO2).

Toda actividad humana implica un coste para el medioambiente, que se puede plasmar en porcentajes de emisiones de gases contaminantes en la atmósfera y entre todos ellos, el dióxido de carbono es uno de los más nefastos para el clima mundial y uno de los principales responsables del efecto invernadero. Todavía no se ha llegado a entender exactamente la repercusión de la actividad de los internautas para el medioambiente, aunque según estudios recientes Internet es responsable del 2 % de las emisiones globales de CO2. En promedio la producción de 1 Kwh. de energía emite 544 gr. de CO2 y son necesarios 13 Kwh. para transmitir 1GB de información, lo que equivale a 7,07 Kg. de CO2.

Evidentemente todos estos datos son aproximativos y afortunadamente este espacio de la Fundación Aquae sigue manteniéndose en unos márgenes de contaminación aceptables si los comparamos con el efecto diario generado por las emisiones de sitios muy populares como Facebook, YouTube o Google. Este último es el sitio más visitado de Internet con un promedio aproximado de 47.000 solicitudes cada segundo. Considerando que su web pesa cerca de 2 MB, se puede afirmar que a raíz de su uso la atmósfera recibe una cantidad que se acerca a los 500 Kg. de CO2 por segundo.

Todo esto se desprende de CO2GLE, un nuevo proyecto para Internet de la artista, docente e investigadora Joana Moll, que se expondrá a partir de mañana en The Promise Of The Internet, una exposición organizada por Connect The Dots. La obra de Joana Moll, que se proyectará en distintos espacios del vanguardista centro de arte de Sheffield (Reino Unido), es una despiadada y cruda página web que, gracias al empleo de un algoritmo, evoluciona inexorablemente relatando a través de los números la irremediable realidad sobre la cantidad de dióxido de carbono que Google lanza en la atmósfera. “CO2GLE se sitúa en una zona ambigua entre arte e investigación. Es una performance virtual simbólica, que intenta crear un espacio para la reflexión y el pensamiento crítico en relación a las consecuencias materiales de la híper-aceleración del infospace”, explica Moll, una creadora transdisciplinaria que trabaja en la investigación creativa sobre el uso de las nuevas tecnologías y su repercusión en la sociedad contemporánea.

La artista nos explicó como la idea de CO2GLE surgió después de varios años investigando los métodos de videovigilancia civil en la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México para Arizona: move and get shot, su anterior trabajo. “Me dediqué a estudiar cómo ciudadanos civiles controlan la frontera desde sus casas a través de cámaras web y plataformas online, que les permiten denunciar a las autoridades la entrada de inmigración ilegal en territorio estadounidense. Durante esa exploración me preocupó mucho la desconexión entre la acción y la consecuencia al operar por el medio digital, sobretodo la dilución de las responsabilidades de la acción y sus implicaciones éticas, políticas, económicas y medioambientales”, indica Moll relatando como a través de esa inquietud, a finales de 2013 empezó a preguntarse acerca del impacto material del uso de Internet.

“En realidad no tenía muy claro por dónde empezar y comencé a investigar la cantidad de kilovatio-hora (Kwh.) que se necesita para cargar la información en la red. Obviamente este proceso se traduce en emisiones de dióxido de carbono (CO2), y me pregunté cómo es posible que una conexión tan obvia estuviera tan desdibujada en la imaginación social. Calcular las emisiones exactas generadas por las comunicaciones en la red es extremadamente difícil debido a la gran cantidad de actores participantes en el proceso, entonces CO2GLE nació con la idea de hacer visible la materialidad de lo virtual y resaltar esa conexión”, concluye Moll que actualmente está desarrollando un plugin para navegadores, que permitirá calcular en tiempo real las emisiones aproximadas que un usuario genera al navegar por la red.

Sin embargo su investigación no concluye allí y sin ahondar mucho en la repercusión ecológica generada por las principales industrias, la artista ha querido compartir con nosotros también unas estadísticas sobre la contaminación de los pequeños objetos domésticos y las acciones cotidianas, que a pesar de llevar tiempo circulando por la red parecen no haber generado mucha sorpresa en la opinión pública. Sin embargo hay datos asombrosos, por ejemplo planchar una camiseta produce una emisión de 25 gr. y un minuto de llamada por el móvil puede alcanzar los 57 gr. En cambio se calcula que un tweet genera aproximadamente 0.2 gr. de CO2, mucho menos que los 4 gr. que requiere enviar un email o los 12 gr. necesarios para mantener encendido un ordenador portátil durante una hora.

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Más sobre la artista de Arttextum:

Joana Moll, artista Arttextum
Joana Moll

These Two Women Designed A 3D Zebra Crossing In Gujarat And It’s One Of A Kind!

Author: Souvik Ray
Via India Times | Marzo 10, 2016

 

3D street art never fails to amaze us. Simply because they have a visual appeal that one can just immerse themselves in.

Artists Saumya Pandya Thakkar and Shakuntala Pandya from Ahmedabad designed something innovative that not only serves an artistic purpose but ensures road safety for pedestrians.The motto was to increase the attention of drivers through new flat patterns of Zebra Crossings.

The authorities have tested the effects in Ahmedabad and has approved it as successful concept till now. However there are limitations in designs due to the highway norms and the artist has just applied the ordered design by connected authorities. The design has been eligible for the copyright as well.

The 3-dimensional zebra crossing gives an illusion to oncoming drivers that it is a blockade, hence making them slow down. The novel idea will be used near schools and accident prone areas in Ahmedabad to reduce road related accidents and allow pedestrians to safely cross the road.

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Marilyn Boror Bor, artista Arttextum
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